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Batteries Not Included Jul 01, 2015 A group exhibition guest curated by artist Victor Villa of designer toys made from custom urban vinyl, resin, and designer plush. 64 other events on Wednesday, July 1
 
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Canvassed | Art & culture 06.28.2015 60 hours ago

Annie Preece intertwines an octopus with an elephant

The Carlsbad Art Wall gets an awesome new paint job

- By Meghan Roos

Earlier this year, we watched Los Angeles-based artist bumblebeelovesyou paint a child playing with a cootie catcher on the east-facing outside wall of Señor Grubby’s. In May, Morley brought his interactive installment "If I Knew Then What I Know Now" to the dubbed "Carlsbad Art Wall" and invited onlookers to add chalk messages of their own. So what's next? 

“I might do an octopus,” said Annie Preece, a street artist from L.A. and the third artist to color the outdoor rotating urban canvas. "I’m not sure yet. I’m one of those people that likes to wing it.”

CityBeat talked to Preece just days before she covered the wall with the eye-catching elephant-octopus mashup pictured above. 

The Carlsbad Art Wall, measuring at 28-by-16-feet, is curated by local artist Bryan Snyder. For now, Snyder is focusing on a rotating list of street artists he knows from his time working in Los Angeles, but he intends to open mural proposals to the public next year. 

“I like to present the idea as a learning platform, where people can come and learn how to create art,” Snyder explained. “People like this idea. We’ve gotten amazing attendance.”

Snyder will require muralists to share their plans for the wall with him in the future, but Preece was a special case.

 “With her, you don’t know what you’re going to get,” Snyder said. “I know it will be skillful, but who knowsshe’s a wacky, fun person, so whatever she paints will be fun for the community to watch and see.”

Though currently based in Los Angeles, Preece got her start as a teenaged graffiti artist in San Francisco in the 1990s. She occasionally creates commissioned artwork for companies like Red Bull and Warner Bros Music, but canvases like the Carlsbad Art Wall allow her to be a bit more creative. 

“Murals are always really fun to do,” Preece said. “It’s fun to go big.”

at 11:12 PM | Permalink | Comments
 
 
Canvassed | Art & culture 03.16.2015 107 days ago

'Kin' navigates complexities of relationships

One actor steals the show at Ion Theatre

- By David Coddon
Hannah Logan was a San Diego Theatre Critics Circle award winner last month for her performance in 2014's creepy Bug, produced by Ion Theatre in Hillcrest. Logan is back in an Ion production, and she's the best reason to see the relationship drama Kin, written by Bathsheba Doran. Logan is both hilarious and pathetic—and, come to think of it, hilariously pathetic—as Helena, the kind of luckless would-be actress who wants to play her namesake in A Midsummer Night's Dream but ends up cast as Bottom. Her character's foibles are much more interesting than the play's principal relationship, the one between an uptight academic (Rhianna Basore) and an Irish-born personal trainer (Evan Kendig). The resolution of that uneasy courtship is a true head-scratcher, but there's enough of Logan, plus touching turns by Donal Pugh and Katie Copeland, to recommend Kin.

Kin runs through April 4.
at 09:28 AM | Permalink | Comments
 
 
Canvassed | Art & culture 02.23.2015 127 days ago

"West Side Story" launches new era for San Diego Musical Theatre

The sound in Spreckels Theatre, however, is not up to par

- By David Coddon

What's most noteworthy about San Diego Musical Theatre's current production of West Side Story is where it's being produced: Downtown at the Spreckels Theatre. It's a new home for SDMT, which had been staging its musicals in the North Park Theatre, a venue that's OK for bands but frankly underwhelming for live theater. So, it was a little disappointing to find the acoustics at the Spreckels for West Side Story, one of Broadway's ground-breaking classics, so tinny, at least when I was there on Saturday night. Let's hope that's an anomaly. As for the production, it's top-shelf: smart, jazzy choreography by Randy Slovacek, exciting fight scenes between the Jets and the Sharks and, among the talented ensemble, Natalie Nucci as a sexy, sassy and indomitable Anita.

West Side Story runs through March 1.

at 11:06 AM | Permalink | Comments
 
 
Canvassed | Art & culture 02.14.2015 136 days ago

Valentine's Day at Queen Califia's Magical Circle

Niki de Saint Phalle's sculpture garden is the perfect backdrop for a sweet surprise

- By Kinsee Morlan

Vandalism and natural wear and tear caused the city of Escondido to close Niki de Saint Phalle's iconic "Queen Califia's Magical Circle" for more than a year.

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at 09:09 PM | Permalink | Comments
 
 
Canvassed | Art & culture 02.12.2015 138 days ago

'Without Walls' theater checks into Lafayette Hotel

'The Grift' teaches audiences how to con a con man

- By David Coddon

I've always had a sentimental attachment to the Lafayette Hotel in North Park. Maybe because of all those visits to the on-site Red Fox Room and the enjoyment of its killer cocktails. Or maybe because it's the closest thing San Diego has to evoking "Old Hollywood."

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at 12:27 PM | Permalink | Comments
 
 
Canvassed | Art & culture 01.27.2015

Remembering Daniel Jackson, Barrio brews, outdoor opera and more to do this week

Our weekly Red List round-up

- By CityBeat Staff

Honoring Daniel Jackson: Saxophonist Daniel Jackson was a giant of the San Diego jazz scene 

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at 01:25 PM | Permalink | Comments
 
 
Canvassed | Art & culture 01.20.2015

Experimental theatre at the Lafayette Hotel, a chat with top local designers and more to do this week

Our weekly Red List round-up

- By CityBeat Staff

Arsalun Tafazoli and Paul Basile make a great team. Tafazoli's the co-founder of CH Projects, the folks behind some of San Diego's best restaurants and bars—Polite Provisions, Craft & Commerce, Ironside Fish & Oyster among them. Basile, through his BASILE Studio, has made those places—and a number of other San Diego eateries—look cool. From 3 to 5 p.m. Thursday, Jan. 22, the two will sit down to talk about their collaborative work at Polite Provisions (4696 30th St., North Park), which won a 2014 Orchid Award for interior design. The chat's part of Designing Minds, an ongoing series of events that highlight the people who make San Diego a more attractive place. Your $30 ticket gets you in and hooked up with one of the bar's delicious craft cocktails. Can't make it to this one? Tafazoli and Basile will bring the talk to Ironside in Little Italy on Feb. 26.

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at 11:54 AM | Permalink | Comments
 
 
Canvassed | Art & culture 01.13.2015

Music in an old bread factory, art on the beach and more to do this week

Our weekly Red List round-up

- By CityBeat Staff

Fresh Sound sounds off

Few live music series provide as outside-the-box a listening experience as the Fresh Sound concert series. Curated by Bonnie Wright, and now in its 19th year, Fresh Sound kicks off its 2015 season with a percussion concert by Red Fish Blue Fish. Directed by Steve Schick—founding percussionist of Bang on a Can and a professor at UCSD—the ensemble will be performing Michael Gordon’s "Timber," an hour-long complex and polyrhythmic piece that's played entirely on pieces of wood of different lengths and pitches. On paper it seems simple enough, but in person it promises to be a one-of-a-kind aural experience. The concert takes place at 7:30 p.m. Thursday, Jan. 15, at Bread & Salt in Logan Heights (1955 Julian Ave.). Admission is $15.


Hoppy and happy

If you’ve ever made mental notes on what does and doesn't make a good IPA, you’re probably going to want to check out the 2015 San Diego Beer Fest. Yup: get those pretzel necklaces ready and head over to Liberty Station (2640 Historic Decatur Road, Point Loma) on Saturday, Jan. 17. With more than 50 breweries offering tastes, live music and a fleet of food trucks, the fifth-annual fest kicks off 2015 beer-tasting events in style. Breweries include locals like Hess, Green Flash and Monkey Paw, as well as out-of-town suds Lagunitas, Speakeasy and NInkasi. The event goes from 2 to 5 p.m. and costs $40. Or, grab a VIP ticket for $50 and get in at 1 p.m.


Dance, reimagined

Last fall, Malashock Dance kicked off a series of performances, called "The Engagement Ring," with the aim of transforming the audience's understanding of what a dance performance should be. The first installment, Sadie Weinberg's happiness: an experiment, was less a dance performance and more of an experience, involving an audience survey, dialogue, a group dance- and sing-along and the strangely beautiful act of pouring sand into metal bowls. The second installment, directed by Emily Miller and Elyssa Dru Rosenberg and called Tour de Dance: Time and Again, takes place Saturday, Jan. 17, when attendees will take a guided tour through Liberty Station's Dance Place San Diego (2650 Truxton Road, Suite 202, Point Loma) with each space featuring a different performance centered on how we experience time. The show starts at 7 p.m. and admission is free, but RSVP is required.


Art on the beach

In December 2013, Morgan Mandalay had an idea: Why not use the front room of his Chicago apartment as an art gallery? The artist and curator got his roommate to agree and Sunday Project was born, inviting emerging artists to use the room to experiment and play. Now the former San Diegan is now back in town—working on his MFA at UCSD—and he’s brought Sunday Project with him, though the project's got a new name and exhibitions aren't being held in Mandalay's apartment. Sunday Project For 15, or SPF15, is a series of art shows happening in a 10-by-10-foot pop-up canopy on the beach. The first one opens from 2 to 5 p.m. Sunday, Jan. 18, on Dog Beach in Ocean Beach and features site-specific, sound works, drawings and sculptures by Chicago artists Connor Creagan, Tim Mann and Jon Waites. Email info@sunday-project.com for details.


 

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at 12:22 PM | Permalink | Comments
 
 
Canvassed | Art & culture 01.06.2015

San Diego music history in Tijuana, Jamaican music at MCASD and more to do this week

Our weekly Red List round-up

- By CityBeat Staff

 About the music

San Diego was once referred to as "the next Seattle," considered to have an underground music scene on the cusp of national attention. So, what happened? It’s Gonna Blow: San Diego’s Music Underground 1986-1996 documents that scene's wariness of making it big and looks at what became of the musicians caught amid the hype. Unfortunately, a Jan. 9 screening at the Museum of Photographic Arts in Balboa Park is sold out, but there's a second screening happening in Tijuana on Saturday, Jan. 10, at 1250 (located next to Mous Tache Bar at Calle Madero #1250, between 6th and 7th avenues). The film starts at 8 p.m., followed by performances by band Octagrape, Innerds and Bumbklaatt. Admission is a mere 30 pesos, or $3.

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at 12:07 PM | Permalink | Comments
 
 
Canvassed | Art & culture 12.30.2014

Tasty tapas, dancing dudes, 2014 in review and more to do this week

Our weekly Red List round-up

- By Kinsee Morlan

Delicious happy hour

Chef Christian Graves has been creating tasty eats at JSix Restuarant (616 J St., Downtown) for as long as we can remember and reaping well-earned best-chef (and, last year from Eater San Diego, "hottest chef") honors. In January, Graves comes out of the kitchen and takes a post behind the bar for Tapas Takeover, when he'll be preparing small plates with a different theme each week from 5 to 7 p.m., starting Monday, Jan. 5, and happening each Monday in January (each plate is a mere $5). The first takeover is all about ceviches that'll be paired with dealer's choice cocktails (JSix's head bartender, Chris Burkett, kicks ass). Charcuterie is the theme for Monday, Jan. 12Jan. 19 is described as "The Egg in fun presentations" and cheese rounds things out on Jan. 26.

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at 11:18 AM | Permalink | Comments
 
 

 

 
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