My Friends

Arrow Up

Arrow Up
Arrow Down
,
  • Mon
    20
  • Tue
    21
  • Wed
    22
  • Thu
    23
  • Fri
    24
  • Sat
    25
  • Sun
    26
Suds & Science: Genetic Ancestry Testing Oct 20, 2014 Enjoy a pint and learn about your genetic ancestry from Lynn Jorde (Department of Human Genetics, University of Utah) and Charmaine Royal (Center on Genomics, Race, Identity & Difference, Duke University). 54 other events on Monday, October 20
 
Fall Arts
Epic San Diego Museum of Art exhibition promises a textbook lesson in the evolution of modern works
Editorial
Kevin Faulconer’s likely to tack left on sustainability
Film
Adaptation of Patricia Highsmith novel tops our coverage of movies screening around town
News
With few specifics on who they were looking for, officers held the wrong man at gunpoint
Theater
Steve Martin and Edie Brickell’s musical leads our rundown of local plays

 

 
Log in to use your Facebook account with
San Diego CityBeat

Login With Facebook Account

Recent Activity on San Diego CityBeat
 
Home / Blogs / Canvassed
. . . .
Wednesday, Jan 11, 2012 - Canvassed | Art & culture

Jacob Livengood

Meet the San Diego CityBeat cover artist this week

By Kinsee Morlan
Jacob Livengood Jacob Livengood

Jacob Livengood starts out with basic shapes and then colors in a piece by using the tip of his brush and tiny dots of paint. His works are often bright and, on first glance, cheery. But if you look closer, you can sometimes catch the gorier, darker or deeper side of Livengood’s imagination.

“An Eager Disposition,” the art on the cover of CityBeat this week, is one of seven in Livengood’s Consequences Of series. “They are these seemingly happy characters,” Livengood said, “but there’s a back story…. Each one represents different consequences of certain actions. You know, like the consequences of being greedy— stuff like that.”

The smiling character on the cover represents the consequence of being overly cheerful. The character, Livengood explains, is ornate, detailed and somewhat in-your-face and over-the-top.

“Just like being too cheery, it can be annoying to people,” he said.

The unique dot technique Livengood uses is similar to traditional Aboriginal dot paintings, but when the young artist first started doing it, he had no idea where he’d seen the look; he just knew he enjoyed it.

“I like my twist on it,” he said. “It’s definitely a modern take on the aboriginal style.”








Are you a San Diego artist who wants to have your work featured on the cover of CityBeat? or Email arts editor Kinsee Morlan
 
 
Close
Close
Close