My Friends

Arrow Up

Arrow Up
Arrow Down
,
  • Wed
    20
  • Thu
    21
  • Fri
    22
  • Sat
    23
  • Sun
    24
  • Mon
    25
  • Tue
    26
Dead Kevin Aug 20, 2014 The comedy trio of Ahmed Bharoocha, Ryan O’Flanagan and Jack Robichaud have been featured on Funny or Die, Huffington Post UK, BuzzFeed and shown regularly at Comedy Meltdown. 68 other events on Wednesday, August 20
 
News
Re-casting the original trilogy with local politicos
Spin Cycle
Digging into the DNA of a company deal
Film
New dramedy from Aaron Katz and Martha Stephens tops our coverage of movies screening around town
News
Former customs agent got more than seven years for smuggling drugs and people into the U.S., but mysterious events are raising questions about the government’s prosecution
News
How one case study could potentially transform City Heights

 

 
Log in to use your Facebook account with
San Diego CityBeat

Login With Facebook Account

Recent Activity on San Diego CityBeat
 
Home / Blogs / Canvassed
. . . .
Friday, Oct 04, 2013 - Canvassed | Art & culture

'Few' if any subtle messages

Personal ads speak loudest in Old Globe world premiere

By David Coddon
theater Eva Kaminsky and Michael Laurence in The Few.
- Photo by Jim Cox

The Few could well be the answer to this rhetorical question: How many people today read newspapers? But in Samuel D. Hunter's one-act play The Few, making its world premiere at The Old Globe in Balboa Park, at least one newspaper boasts a truckload of readers. Of course, the story is set in the waning, pre-Y2K days of 1999. And, the folks reading the newspaper (also called The Few) are doing so exclusively for the personal ads that constitute its content.

But this slow-moving tale asserts that human beings in all their loneliness and quiet desperation will do whatever they can to make a connection, and that the truckin' crowd is no exception. They're the personal-ad writers and readers in The Few, and the forlorn trio producing the little paper from the inside of a trailer parked in Idaho are lonely-hearts facilitators.

Other than a startling (but rather funny) sequence in which young Matthew (Gideon Glick) peppers sad-sack Brian (Michael Laurence) with "ammo" from a BB gun, The Few lopes along at tortoise speed. Significant pauses, intense stares between Brian and his unrequited co-publisher, QZ (Eva Kaminsky), and Brian's wrestling with inner demons (implied in his ceiling-ward gazes and hanging of head) result in a slower-than-leisurely pace.

Ultimately, QZ and Brian openly confront each other and reveal their secrets, but they never let fly as we keep waiting for them to do. Matthew's a messed-up kid who, in spite of that, seems to have a future ahead of him with more possibilities than the grown-ups have. His knack for poetry raises hope that the BB-gun thing is not a harbinger of more dangerous episodes to come.

Oddly, the answering-machine messages—personal ads dictated by readers of the little paper—are much more interesting than the three live characters. (They were recorded by 17 San Diegans who actually auditioned). Natural and spontaneous sounding, they avoid the "good buddy" trucker stereotype to which a lesser production might have resorted. These lonely people could be anyone from anywhere across the Great Divide.

The Few could use more of them.

 
 
Close
Close
Close