My Friends

Arrow Up

Arrow Up
Arrow Down
,
  • Thu
    18
  • Fri
    19
  • Sat
    20
  • Sun
    21
  • Mon
    22
  • Tue
    23
  • Wed
    24
Norm Macdonald Sep 18, 2014 The star of Norm, Dirty Work and pretty much the greatest host of SNL's "Weekend Update" ever gets back to his stand-up roots. 64 other events on Thursday, September 18
 
Spin Cycle
And speaking of fights, who would win: Jason Roe or a great white shark?
Arts & Culture feature
Holding a brief candle to a locally made modern thriller
News
Climate plan, water conservation and bag ban are on the slow track
Check 1, Check 2 | Music & nightlife
Band plays live for first time in 20 years
Concerts
Bands coming to town and just-announced shows

 

 
Log in to use your Facebook account with
San Diego CityBeat

Login With Facebook Account

Recent Activity on San Diego CityBeat
 
Home / Blogs / Last Blog on Earth
. . . .
Thursday, Jul 18, 2013 - Last Blog on Earth | News

Attorney challenges Mayor Bob Filner over rumors of possible defamation lawsuit

By Kelly Davis
IMG_1381 Cory Briggs (left), Donna Frye and Marco Gonzalez
- Photo by David Rolland

Cory Briggs, one of the attorneys who's demanding that San Diego Mayor Bob Filner step down amid allegations of sexual harassment, today sent Filner a letter saying he's received "numerous" press inquires "seeking to 'confirm that Mayor Filner has filed a defamation suit'" against Briggs. The court website shows no such filings, but it can take up to two days for a new case to appear, Briggs says.

Briggs, along with attorney Marco Gonzalez and former City Councilmember Donna Frye, asked Filner to resign after hearing stories from women—city employees, mayoral campaign volunteers and constituents—who say the mayor groped them, attempted to kiss them and made inappropriate sexual comments. In a tweet earlier this week, Briggs called the mayor a "predator."  

Briggs' letter says that while he doesn't welcome a lawsuit, he's "[willing] to do everything reasonably necessary" to expedite it. 

If Filner were to pursue such a case, the burden of proof would be on him. He'd need to prove: that Briggs made a statement of fact, not opinion; that the statement is false; and that Briggs said it knowing it was false.

But, given that none of the women have been willing to come forward publicly, and investigations by the city's personnel department and the federal Equal Employment Opportunity Commission—which has jurisdiction over claims involving city employees—could take months, there's a benefit to an expedited trial, Briggs says: "The essential question is whether the allegations we've made are true or false."

The mayor's spokesperson didn't respond to an email from CityBeat.

 
 
Close
Close
Close