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The Grand Budapest Hotel Jul 23, 2014 Wes Anderson’s latest takes place in an opulent hotel set in a fictional Eastern European country right before World War I. 72 other events on Wednesday, July 23
 
Arts & Culture feature
New business is illuminating the imagery found in science
Theater
Joint production by La Jolla Playhouse and San Diego Rep leads our rundown of local plays
Spin Cycle
Did Carl DeMaio’s partner overstep his authority by ousting business-association chief?
News
San Diego planning director’s uphill battle to create walkable communities
Editorial
Mayor’s actions so far betray his pitch, but there’s still hope

 

 
 
Far Afield

Drinking responsibly at the Morley Field disc-golf course

Or: Hey, you kids, get off of our lawn!

By Hutton Marshall

On the first tee of the finely groomed Morley Field disc-golf course, five college-age kids are waiting to begin their round. With startling synchronicity, they each grab a can of Natural Light beer and shotgun it without a care about those watching.

Far Afield

San Diego has a pro paintball Dynasty

Who knew the team is the most successful in the sport’s history?

By David Rolland

Five young men covered in blue and black protective uniforms are clustered together at one end of a field on the base at Camp Pendleton, each armed with a gun and poised to attack.

Far Afield

Sweating the yogis at Bikram Yoga Mira Mesa

More than two-dozen postures in 105-degree heat is brutal

By Jamie Pasternack

It’s 3:30 p.m. and Eeva Bernardo has the thermostat of her yoga studio cranked precisely to 105 degrees. She takes off her shoes as she enters and begins wiping the wall-length mirror to get rid of any sweat left over from her earlier class.

Far Afield

Britney Henry hopes to throw her way to the Olympics

Can centrifugal force carry a San Diego athlete to London?

By Dave Maass

Britney Henry throws hammers. Mind you, these aren’t your hardware-store, ball-peen or claw hammers. Henry throws the Olympic hammer, an ancient cousin of the sledgehammer, with a cannonball-like sphere at the end of a wire.

Far Afield

Undisputed Ones score goals—and set ’em, too

San Diego soccer team hopes to take their game overseas

By Kelly Davis

One side of Rosa Parks Field in City Heights is a patchwork of dust and dry grass. At halftime, Janice Jordan passes around a bag of Halls to her team, the Undisputed Ones— UD1s for short—to soothe dry throats.

Far Afield

Fighting to keep chivalry alive

Crossing blades at a class in historical sword combat

By Kinsee Morlan

Weapon in hand, I immediately want to swing my sword around like Penelope Cruz in Pirates of the Caribbean: On Stranger Tides, maybe finishing my swordsmanship debut with a backflip into the splits.

Far Afield

A surfer learns to stand-up paddleboard

San Diego’s varied waters are ideal for newish hybrid sport

By Morgan Wood

A few days before trying my luck on an SUP, I did what any self-respecting neophyte would have done: I Googled the sport and watched a few clips on YouTube. I found that a serious SUP subculture has emerged—and then I watched a cat jump into a cardboard box.

Far Afield

Ridiculed and ostracized, rollerbladers hit new strides

Did you know that San Diego is considered a mecca for inline skating?

By Peter Holslin

As skateboarding culture became increasingly mainstream, the anti-rollerblading propaganda got louder and aggressive inline skating steadily waned in the United States

Far Afield

Racewalking may look silly, but just try to keep up

Olympic sport is all about swaying hips, straight legs and surprising speed

By Claire Trageser

The racewalker’s goal is simple: Walk as fast as possible. In fact, racewalking—an Olympic sport—has only two rules. One foot must always be on the ground (unlike in running) and each leg must be straight when its foot touches down.

Far Afield

San Diego Parkour Club finds the quickest route between two points

For members, it’s all about philosophy and movement

By Ryan Bradford

We’re standing on top of a Downtown building that Tisdale manages, six stories up, on a particularly breezy evening. It’s his suggestion to hold our interview up there, to show me where he practices parkour. It’s an astonishing scene, set against San Diego’s skyline, and one that I can’t fully appreciate due to my intense fear of heights. I tell him that I’m fine, but, really, I’m terrified.

Inside a Whale's Vagina

Hello, new life

I’m ending this column so I can focus on helping orphans in Mexico

By D.A. Kolodenko

When she was 11, Marzena’s 35-year-old father died of cancer. Four years later, her mother, at age 37, also died of cancer. Relatives decided that 15-year-old Marzena would leave Poland to live with her father’s sister in the United States.

Inside a Whale's Vagina

Atop Palomar Mountain

San Diego’s spiritual mecca needs our help

By D.A. Kolodenko

Life is fleeting. It’s good. It’s bad. Then we vanish. It’s pointless one minute and precious the next. Who knows what it’s for?

Inside a Whale's Vagina

There are no speakeasies in San Diego

Noble Experiment and Prohibition are more like great saloons

By D.A. Kolodenko

Imagine you’re inside a bar in San Diego. Let’s say it’s in the attic of a shoe-repair shop in a part of town where you don’t want to walk around at night. You can get the password only by sending a self-addressed, stamped envelope to a post-office box.

Inside a Whale's Vagina

Soul sores

10 disgraces of San Diego spaces

By D.A. Kolodenko

There may be more pressing misuses of our public and private spaces, like lack of adequate homeless shelters, but these are my 10 pet peeves of the last 10 years. The dominant theme: carelessness.

Inside a Whale's Vagina

Friday the 13th was just another day

Get over it already!

By D.A. Kolodenko

Last Friday was Friday the 13th! So what? You don’t actually believe that bullshit, do you? Apparently, you do. Or at least a lot of you do.

Inside a Whale's Vagina

Why I prefer bars without televisions

Starlite Lounge and Jaynes Gastropub are two local spots that understand

By D.A. Kolodenko

I like endearing aspects of our culture that are fading away, and a main one is a bar without a television.

Inside a Whale's Vagina

Remembering the Great Blackout of 2011

What were you doing when we all went off the grid?

By D.A. Kolodenko

Earlier this month, the Federal Energy Regulation Commission (FERC) ended its eight-month review of the massive power outage across San Diego, Imperial County, Yuma and Baja California on Sept. 8, 201

Inside a Whale's Vagina

Welcome to San Diego, where hate happens

Remembering the day I got beaten up in La Jolla

By D.A. Kolodenko

The patrol car arrived and two officers stepped out and took a look at us teenage musicians with our weird clothes and knew all they needed to know.

Inside a Whale's Vagina

Celebrating San Diego’s grunion run

These sexy little beasts are a late-night beach tradition

By D.A. Kolodenko

“What are they doing?” one of the German students asked, pointing down at the kids with flashlights and buckets, running along the beach and squealing under the moonlight.

Inside a Whale's Vagina

Remembering my near encounter with the Clairemont tank guy

A visit to Mesa College takes me back to 1995 and the last day of Shawn Nelson’s life

By D.A. Kolodenko

The other night, I stopped by my favorite Convoy Street Japanese joint for a gobo salad, but instead of driving straight home afterward, I swung by Mesa College Drive and pulled over on the street and sat there for a moment, staring into the past.

The Enrique Experience

It’s curtains for the Experience

Sad to say, it’s time to bludgeon the baby

By Enrique Limon

At times, I’ve felt as if my tenure at CityBeat has played out like low-budg version of The Devil Wears Prada (“a million girls would kill for your job” is one of my many mantras). So, with my love not just for alt-media, but journalism in general, still intact, I decided to kill the baby, so to speak.

The Enrique Experience

Fur and loathing in Lake Murray

Wearing animal costumes isn’t always a sex thing, ya know

By Enrique Limon

Though fur-suit enthusiasts have a public Meetup page, it wasn’t easy to get access to the outing.

The Enrique Experience

San Diego’s leather community believes the children are the future

The Eagle helps disadvantaged kids with eyebrow-raising Easter baskets

By Enrique Limon

If you’re a regular reader, you know that The Eagle holds a special place in my pervy heart; some of my best nights there have turned into columns, while the really good ones I’ve kept between me and Layla, the friendly woman at the free clinic.

The Enrique Experience

Yarn-bombing the signs

Clairemont man is unblocking up the scenery and breaking up minds

By Enrique Limon

Guiding his buddy as he sewed up the stockinette-stitched sleeve along the stop-sign rod, he recounted the tale of his first stop-sign flower

The Enrique Experience

In search of... Chango

Local surfer gives ‘monkey business’ a whole new meaning

By Enrique Limon

Slevcove became familiar with the whimsical, kitschy statuette during high-school church-group trips to the TJ slums and vividly recalls that first encounter.

The Enrique Experience

Artist Paulo Nazareth’s work is bananas

Brazilian artist who made a splash at Art Basel kicks it in San Diego

By Enrique Limon

There are two conditions from which Brazilian-boartist Paulo Nazareth will most likely never suffer: potassium deficiency and male pattern baldness.

The Enrique Experience

Chad Michaels is out to take reality TV with a bang (and a tuck)

Local queen is going to ‘drag Disneyland’

By Enrique Limon

Standing well over 6 feet tall in heels (closer to 7 with the right hair), his presence is imposing, and halfway through his transformation, the similarities between him and his idol are uncanny.

The Enrique Experience

I spent Christmas in the clink

Deck the halls with a little rosé, a zealous cop and some new friends in the holding tank

By Enrique Limon

On a mission, he crossed Vermont Street. I waited for the walk sign, and as I joined him, a cop shone his patrol lights and ordered me to stop. The officer, sans badge or ID tag, instructed me to surrender my identification, proceeded with what I believe was an illegal search and wrote me a jaywalking ticket.

The Enrique Experience

The first rule of finding your muse: Carry a notepad

Literary masterpieces don’t come from ink-covered body parts

By Enrique Limon

Recently, I found myself at a creative dead-end. Yes, a couple of news stories had caught my eye, and, yes, I’d had my share of debaucherous nights. But I just wasn’t sure how to translate that to a 900-word narrative.

The Floating Library

David Goodis come out of the dark

Shadowy author of hardboiled crime gets his moment in the sun

By Jim Ruland

Goodis' stories were straightforward, and his characters tended to be working-class people on the fringes of respectability, but his prose was more lyrical and highly stylized.

The Floating Library

‘Deep Ellum’ by Brandon Hobson: Only the lonely

A short novel about alienation in dysfunctional families

By Jim Ruland

Deep Ellum by Brandon Hobson is a haunting novel about a fractured family struggling to overcome a dysfunctional history.

The Floating Library

‘Backswing’ by Aaron Burch is a reality check

New collection of short stories takes the pulse of middle-class America

By Jim Ruland

With Backswing, Aaron Burch reminds us that things can always get darker for those who flee from the real. 

The Floating Library

‘Spent’ by Antonia Crane: not-so-happy endings

Memoirs of a California sex worker

By Jim Ruland

Antonia Crane opens her new sex-worker memoir, Spent, from Barnacle Books, with one of the least glamorous, non-erotic sex scenes I've read in recent memory. 

The Floating Library

Echoes of True Detective in three recent novels

‘Not for Nothing’ by Stephen Graham Jones, ‘The Cutting Season’ by Attica Locke and ‘Rivers’ by Michael Farris Smith

By Jim Ruland

Lately, my plate of shrimp has been True Detective. It's been at least six weeks since the season finale and I can't stop thinking about the show. I see it everywhere—even in the books I read.

The Floating Library

Dark tales from two San Diego-area short-story writers

Reviews of ‘Black Cloud’ by Juliet Escoria and ‘What Happened Here’ by Bonnie ZoBell

By Jim Ruland

Juliet Escoria's stories feature young women at loose ends. They do ketamine or coke or heroin or meth. They drink too much and choose partners poorly.

The Floating Library

Is ‘The King in Yellow’ the key to HBO’s ‘True Detective’?

Investigating Robert W. Chambers’ obscure collection of stories

By Jim Ruland

One of the biggest surprises to come from the first seven episodes of HBO's True Detective doesn't occur onscreen; it comes with the revelation that the wildly popular show references Robert W. Chambers' obscure short-story collection The King in Yellow.

The Floating Library

William S. Burroughs at 100

‘Naked Lunch’ author’s feline fixation

By Jim Ruland

If William S. Burroughs, author of Naked Lunch, were alive today, he'd be 100 years old. I don't know why this factoid fascinates me so much. Maybe it's because when he died in 1997 at age 83, he looked 100. 

The Floating Library

Remembering Sandy Hook a year later

A personal take on ‘Newtown: An American Tragedy’ by Matthew Lysiak

By Jim Ruland

Newtown: An American Tragedy is a book that takes us inside Sandy Hook Elementary and describes what happened on one terrible day.

The Floating Library

Sole survivors

A review of ‘Last of the Blue and Gray: Old Men, Stolen Glory, and the Mystery That Outlived the Civil War’

By Jim Ruland

Serrano's book is filled with fascinating stories of old soldiers who are now dead and gone, dropped from thought and faded from recollection.

There She Goz

Thirty, dirty and striving

Revisiting my teenage dreams upon hitting three decades

By Alex Zaragoza

I'm 30 years old. It's official. That milestone birthday's been lurking, and when it finally arrived I welcomed it as I'd welcome a never-ending nacho platter—drunkenly and without fear.

There She Goz

Surviving womanhood

How Krav Maga empowered me to fight violence and misogyny

By Alex Zaragoza

I often find myself in situations where I don't feel safe, not because I have a penchant for hanging out in sketchy neighborhoods, but because that's the world women live in. That's not paranoia.

There She Goz

How Gozie got her groove back

Catching the clap at a dance contest was the best thing ever

By Alex Zaragoza

The thing about most slumps is that they can be conquered, and the moment mine ended came in true Gozer fashion —shaking dat ass hard on a dance floor.

There She Goz

Gooping like Gwyneth

Consciously uncoupling and self-improving, Paltrow-style

By Alex Zaragoza

Breakups blow, especially when there are hurt feelings and disappointment involved and that bitch Gwyneth Paltrow steals your breakup thunder.

There She Goz

Floating in heartbreak

Looking for answers in a sensory-deprivation tank

By Alex Zaragoza

Fans of floatation therapy do it for a number of reasons. Some go for stress relief and to achieve total relaxation, others do it to help with pain. I was there for the third reason floatation therapy has become popular: to allow your brain to be completely clear and focus on something with zero distractions.

There She Goz

A hot date with my vagina

Treat yourself—and your lady business—to some good lovin’

By Alex Zaragoza

I'll admit that my masturbation sessions usually involve lying in bed in a slovenly fashion with Parks & Recreation paused on the TV. It's not the sexiest thing in the world.

There She Goz

Women aren’t funny? Bitch, please!

Standing up to tired gender inequality with dick jokes

By Alex Zaragoza

"Women aren't funny." How many times have we heard that? When I hear it now, it's like seeing a laserdisc player. I think, This still exists?

There She Goz

Confronting fear by consulting the stars

An astrologist told me to trust my wine-soaked gut

By Alex Zaragoza

Fear is very hard to overcome when you feel vulnerable. Should I even trust my gut? That thing's probably pickled in wine and high-fructose corn syrup.

There She Goz

Barefoot and stoned in Hippieville

Boulder and my college roommate are delightfully kooky

By Alex Zaragoza

"That one looks like an elephant doing ballet. Or wait, no. It's playing a guitar. Hold up. I was wrong. It's a T-Rex smoking a joint. Dude, I'm super-fucking-high." This is a direct quote from an incredibly stoned version of me.

There She Goz

Hunting g-g-g-ghosts with a juggalo paranormal investigator

My mom and Jay Willard keep me curled up at night

By Alex Zaragoza

The spirit world is an integral part of Mexican culture. I grew up listening to creepy ghost stories, terrified but unable to keep from asking, "And then what happened?"

 
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