,
  • Wed
    5
  • Thu
    6
  • Fri
    7
  • Sat
    8
  • Sun
    9
  • Mon
    10
  • Tue
    11
Shuck-a-Thon Aug 05, 2015 To celebrate National Oyster Day, six area chefs take a turn behind the raw bar to shuck oysters for a buck apiece. During each chef's hour, 100 percent of the proceeds from oyster sales will go to the chef's chosen charity. 93 other events on Wednesday, August 5
 
Arts & Culture feature
From SuicideGirls and Walking Dead haunted houses to superhero art shows and Nerdist carnivals, there’s plenty to do without a pass.
All Things Tech
Legacy businesses, like MLB, can’t harness control forever
Seen Local
Real estate company carves out significant space for local art
Seen Local
Artist Carl Raymond Schmidt says it’s OK to play
News
A budtender rehashes his job selling medical marijuana

 

 
 
All Things Tech

The virtual trends from Comic-Con 2015

Virtual reality porn, 3D printing and more from this year's convention

By Tom Siebert

The biggest event of the year in San Diego—at least until we get the Super Bowl back (LOL)—is Comic-Con. 

All Things Tech

You can’t manage disruptive technology

Legacy businesses, like MLB, can’t harness control forever

By Tom Siebert

One of the most hallowed but overused and misapplied words in the world of technology is "disruption." Everybody says they're looking to embrace the latest "disruptive" technology to change their business.

Far Afield

Drinking responsibly at the Morley Field disc-golf course

Or: Hey, you kids, get off of our lawn!

By Hutton Marshall

On the first tee of the finely groomed Morley Field disc-golf course, five college-age kids are waiting to begin their round. With startling synchronicity, they each grab a can of Natural Light beer and shotgun it without a care about those watching.

Far Afield

San Diego has a pro paintball Dynasty

Who knew the team is the most successful in the sport’s history?

By David Rolland

Five young men covered in blue and black protective uniforms are clustered together at one end of a field on the base at Camp Pendleton, each armed with a gun and poised to attack.

Far Afield

Sweating the yogis at Bikram Yoga Mira Mesa

More than two-dozen postures in 105-degree heat is brutal

By Jamie Pasternack

It’s 3:30 p.m. and Eeva Bernardo has the thermostat of her yoga studio cranked precisely to 105 degrees. She takes off her shoes as she enters and begins wiping the wall-length mirror to get rid of any sweat left over from her earlier class.

Far Afield

Britney Henry hopes to throw her way to the Olympics

Can centrifugal force carry a San Diego athlete to London?

By Dave Maass

Britney Henry throws hammers. Mind you, these aren’t your hardware-store, ball-peen or claw hammers. Henry throws the Olympic hammer, an ancient cousin of the sledgehammer, with a cannonball-like sphere at the end of a wire.

Far Afield

Undisputed Ones score goals—and set ’em, too

San Diego soccer team hopes to take their game overseas

By Kelly Davis

One side of Rosa Parks Field in City Heights is a patchwork of dust and dry grass. At halftime, Janice Jordan passes around a bag of Halls to her team, the Undisputed Ones— UD1s for short—to soothe dry throats.

Far Afield

Fighting to keep chivalry alive

Crossing blades at a class in historical sword combat

By Kinsee Morlan

Weapon in hand, I immediately want to swing my sword around like Penelope Cruz in Pirates of the Caribbean: On Stranger Tides, maybe finishing my swordsmanship debut with a backflip into the splits.

Far Afield

A surfer learns to stand-up paddleboard

San Diego’s varied waters are ideal for newish hybrid sport

By Morgan Wood

A few days before trying my luck on an SUP, I did what any self-respecting neophyte would have done: I Googled the sport and watched a few clips on YouTube. I found that a serious SUP subculture has emerged—and then I watched a cat jump into a cardboard box.

Far Afield

Ridiculed and ostracized, rollerbladers hit new strides

Did you know that San Diego is considered a mecca for inline skating?

By Peter Holslin

As skateboarding culture became increasingly mainstream, the anti-rollerblading propaganda got louder and aggressive inline skating steadily waned in the United States

Far Afield

Racewalking may look silly, but just try to keep up

Olympic sport is all about swaying hips, straight legs and surprising speed

By Claire Trageser

The racewalker’s goal is simple: Walk as fast as possible. In fact, racewalking—an Olympic sport—has only two rules. One foot must always be on the ground (unlike in running) and each leg must be straight when its foot touches down.

Far Afield

San Diego Parkour Club finds the quickest route between two points

For members, it’s all about philosophy and movement

By Ryan Bradford

We’re standing on top of a Downtown building that Tisdale manages, six stories up, on a particularly breezy evening. It’s his suggestion to hold our interview up there, to show me where he practices parkour. It’s an astonishing scene, set against San Diego’s skyline, and one that I can’t fully appreciate due to my intense fear of heights. I tell him that I’m fine, but, really, I’m terrified.

Hidden San Diego

San Diego Crime Victims Oak Garden provides solace for those who seek it

Cara Knott’s solemn memorial place

By Jessica Johnson

The 1986 murder of 20-year-old Cara Knott by on-duty California Highway Patrol officer Craig Peyer was a case that shook San Diego like an earthquake.

Hidden San Diego

Finding Buddha

A somewhat enlightening hike to Van Dam Peak

By Jessica Johnson

It's a modest trek of about 1,110 feet up to the top of The Van Dam Peak. But be warned, there area a few areas where the incline slopes up quite steeply, and you may have to stop every now and then to take a breather.

Hidden San Diego

Organic in Escondido

Stone Brewing Co.’s revamped farm is open to the public

By Jessica Johnson

Years ago, there was a working farm called La Milpa Organica in the foothills of North Escondido. It was at the end of a dusty dirt road, just a few hundred yards from Interstate 15. I went to a vegan potluck on those farm grounds. 

Hidden San Diego

Discover desert dinosaurs

Galleta Meadows is the home to Jurassic art

By Jessica Johnson

Many fans of outdoor art have never heard about Galleta Meadows. You don’t even have to be all that into the art to be stunned by this collection of sculptures that’s scattered around Borrego Springs.

Inside a Whale's Vagina

Hello, new life

I’m ending this column so I can focus on helping orphans in Mexico

By D.A. Kolodenko

When she was 11, Marzena’s 35-year-old father died of cancer. Four years later, her mother, at age 37, also died of cancer. Relatives decided that 15-year-old Marzena would leave Poland to live with her father’s sister in the United States.

Inside a Whale's Vagina

Atop Palomar Mountain

San Diego’s spiritual mecca needs our help

By D.A. Kolodenko

Life is fleeting. It’s good. It’s bad. Then we vanish. It’s pointless one minute and precious the next. Who knows what it’s for?

Inside a Whale's Vagina

There are no speakeasies in San Diego

Noble Experiment and Prohibition are more like great saloons

By D.A. Kolodenko

Imagine you’re inside a bar in San Diego. Let’s say it’s in the attic of a shoe-repair shop in a part of town where you don’t want to walk around at night. You can get the password only by sending a self-addressed, stamped envelope to a post-office box.

Inside a Whale's Vagina

Soul sores

10 disgraces of San Diego spaces

By D.A. Kolodenko

There may be more pressing misuses of our public and private spaces, like lack of adequate homeless shelters, but these are my 10 pet peeves of the last 10 years. The dominant theme: carelessness.

Inside a Whale's Vagina

Friday the 13th was just another day

Get over it already!

By D.A. Kolodenko

Last Friday was Friday the 13th! So what? You don’t actually believe that bullshit, do you? Apparently, you do. Or at least a lot of you do.

Inside a Whale's Vagina

Why I prefer bars without televisions

Starlite Lounge and Jaynes Gastropub are two local spots that understand

By D.A. Kolodenko

I like endearing aspects of our culture that are fading away, and a main one is a bar without a television.

Inside a Whale's Vagina

Remembering the Great Blackout of 2011

What were you doing when we all went off the grid?

By D.A. Kolodenko

Earlier this month, the Federal Energy Regulation Commission (FERC) ended its eight-month review of the massive power outage across San Diego, Imperial County, Yuma and Baja California on Sept. 8, 201

Inside a Whale's Vagina

Welcome to San Diego, where hate happens

Remembering the day I got beaten up in La Jolla

By D.A. Kolodenko

The patrol car arrived and two officers stepped out and took a look at us teenage musicians with our weird clothes and knew all they needed to know.

Inside a Whale's Vagina

Celebrating San Diego’s grunion run

These sexy little beasts are a late-night beach tradition

By D.A. Kolodenko

“What are they doing?” one of the German students asked, pointing down at the kids with flashlights and buckets, running along the beach and squealing under the moonlight.

Inside a Whale's Vagina

Remembering my near encounter with the Clairemont tank guy

A visit to Mesa College takes me back to 1995 and the last day of Shawn Nelson’s life

By D.A. Kolodenko

The other night, I stopped by my favorite Convoy Street Japanese joint for a gobo salad, but instead of driving straight home afterward, I swung by Mesa College Drive and pulled over on the street and sat there for a moment, staring into the past.

The Enrique Experience

It’s curtains for the Experience

Sad to say, it’s time to bludgeon the baby

By Enrique Limon

At times, I’ve felt as if my tenure at CityBeat has played out like low-budg version of The Devil Wears Prada (“a million girls would kill for your job” is one of my many mantras). So, with my love not just for alt-media, but journalism in general, still intact, I decided to kill the baby, so to speak.

The Enrique Experience

Fur and loathing in Lake Murray

Wearing animal costumes isn’t always a sex thing, ya know

By Enrique Limon

Though fur-suit enthusiasts have a public Meetup page, it wasn’t easy to get access to the outing.

The Enrique Experience

San Diego’s leather community believes the children are the future

The Eagle helps disadvantaged kids with eyebrow-raising Easter baskets

By Enrique Limon

If you’re a regular reader, you know that The Eagle holds a special place in my pervy heart; some of my best nights there have turned into columns, while the really good ones I’ve kept between me and Layla, the friendly woman at the free clinic.

The Enrique Experience

Yarn-bombing the signs

Clairemont man is unblocking up the scenery and breaking up minds

By Enrique Limon

Guiding his buddy as he sewed up the stockinette-stitched sleeve along the stop-sign rod, he recounted the tale of his first stop-sign flower

The Enrique Experience

In search of... Chango

Local surfer gives ‘monkey business’ a whole new meaning

By Enrique Limon

Slevcove became familiar with the whimsical, kitschy statuette during high-school church-group trips to the TJ slums and vividly recalls that first encounter.

The Enrique Experience

Artist Paulo Nazareth’s work is bananas

Brazilian artist who made a splash at Art Basel kicks it in San Diego

By Enrique Limon

There are two conditions from which Brazilian-boartist Paulo Nazareth will most likely never suffer: potassium deficiency and male pattern baldness.

The Enrique Experience

Chad Michaels is out to take reality TV with a bang (and a tuck)

Local queen is going to ‘drag Disneyland’

By Enrique Limon

Standing well over 6 feet tall in heels (closer to 7 with the right hair), his presence is imposing, and halfway through his transformation, the similarities between him and his idol are uncanny.

The Enrique Experience

I spent Christmas in the clink

Deck the halls with a little rosé, a zealous cop and some new friends in the holding tank

By Enrique Limon

On a mission, he crossed Vermont Street. I waited for the walk sign, and as I joined him, a cop shone his patrol lights and ordered me to stop. The officer, sans badge or ID tag, instructed me to surrender my identification, proceeded with what I believe was an illegal search and wrote me a jaywalking ticket.

The Enrique Experience

The first rule of finding your muse: Carry a notepad

Literary masterpieces don’t come from ink-covered body parts

By Enrique Limon

Recently, I found myself at a creative dead-end. Yes, a couple of news stories had caught my eye, and, yes, I’d had my share of debaucherous nights. But I just wasn’t sure how to translate that to a 900-word narrative.

The Floating Library

The weird science of 'Music for Wartime,' 'American Innovations' and 'Gutshot'

History, science and pop culture collide in a trio of new short story collections

By Jim Ruland

Music for Wartime is Rebecca Makkai's third book but her first collection of short stories, which is unusual considering her short stories have appeared in four consecutive editions of The Best American Short Stories, the annual anthology that collects the best literary short fiction published the previous year. 

The Floating Library

Karolina Waclawiak's 'The Invaders' is a beach book for people who hate beach books

Cool off this summer with a novel full of awful beach people doing horrible things to each other

By Jim Ruland

With The Invaders, Karolina Waclawiak welcomes us to Little Neck Cove Yacht & Country Club, a beach community approximately an hour outside of New York City where wealthy retirees on the wrong side of 60 spend their days sailing, playing tennis and drinking the day away.  

The Floating Library

Junkie loves

A look at two books with similar subjects and identical titles

By Jim Ruland

Everyone has heard the saying, "You can't judge a book by its cover," but what if two covers have similar subjects and the exact same title? 

The Floating Library

'Sunblind Almost Motorcrash' is a literary needle drop

Lowbrow meets high concept in Daniel Mahoney's collection of fictitious record reviews

By Jim Ruland

If you love music, but the prospect of reading a collection of record reviews strikes you as a less-than-thrilling use of your time, Daniel Mahoney just might make you reconsider. 

The Floating Library

A trio of debut novels with SoCal connections

Book reviews of 'The Miracle Girl,' 'Oh! You Pretty Things' and 'Everything I Never Told you'

By Jim Ruland

Oceanside author Andrew Roe has written what could be called a pre-apocalyptic novel set in the heady days leading up to Y2K, when doomsday cults were predicting the end of the world as we knew it.

The Floating Library

Kim Gordon’s trip

Sonic Youth guitarist chronicles three decades of music and marriage

By Jim Ruland

Kim Gordon’s memoir, Girl in a Band, begins and ends with her divorce from her longtime husband and bandmate Thurston Moore. 

The Floating Library

Southern California detective tales

Matt Coyle and Earl Javorsky keep readers in suspense

By Jim Ruland

Palm trees, sandy beaches and warm ocean breezes typically aren't the makings of a gritty detective novel. They are in Yesterday's Echo, local author Matt Coyle's debut novel and the first in the Rick Cahill detective series.

The Floating Library

Master of the macabre

Celebrating Edward Gorey’s 90th birthday

By Jim Ruland

The Unstrung Harp is hardly an endorsement for a life in letters, yet it remains one of the most honest books about the writing process I've ever read.

The Floating Library

Two ways of looking at a woman’s body

Reviews of ‘‘You Who Read Me with Passion Now Must Forever Be My Friends’ by Dorothy Iannone and ‘Binary Star’ by Sarah Gerard

By Jim Ruland

In You Who Read Me with Passion Now Must Forever Be My Friends (Siglio Press), a collection works by artist Dorothy Iannone and edited by Lisa Pearson, sex is both everywhere and nowhere. 

The Floating Library

Strangeness in the stacks: 3 works of fiction set in Japan

Reviews of Haruki Murakami’s ‘The Strange Library,’ Yoko Ogawa’s ‘The Housekeeper and the Professor’ and Mary Yukari Waters ‘The Laws of Evening’

By Jim Ruland

I’m not the biggest fan of Haruki Murakami’s fiction, but when I saw a copy of The Strange Library in the bookstore, I had to pick it up. The slender volume sealed in plastic and designed by rock-star book designer Chip Kidd made me intensely curious about what strange magic might be inside.

There She Goz

How to deal with ignorance

Educating the idiots with the National Conflict Resolution Center

By Alex Zaragoza

Over the years, I've tried various methods of dealing with these sort of comments. The worst was ignoring them or laughing with people because I wanted to fit in. When I thankfully outgrew that, I attacked.

There She Goz

From cock to mock

Catania is the place to be when you’re suddenly sober

By Alex Zaragoza

I've been a drinker most of my life. There are childhood photos of my dad holding me as a wee little lamb, giving me a sip of his Coors. "You're not going to like it," he'd say, and he was right.

There She Goz

Tepid for teacher

Molding young minds is exhaustingly fulfilling

By Alex Zaragoza

"I'm just trying to teach you something, goddammit!" she screamed hoarsely through a flood of exasperated tears. "Why do you make everything so difficult?" My seventh grade English teacher Ms. Adams had snapped.

There She Goz

May the fit be with you

Crushing calories with the San Diego Lightsaber Team

By Alex Zaragoza

In my continued pursuit of better health, I search for new ways to stay fit that I can enjoy. That’s why I channeled the fiery passion of the infamous Star Wars kid and met up with the San Diego Lightsaber Team.

There She Goz

Wearing my divorce with pride

I didn’t like it, so I made him take the ring off it

By Alex Zaragoza

I took off my jeans and pulled on the duchess satin and lace gown. It's not nearly close to fitting anymore. Despite being dirty and starting to yellow, it's still lovely.

There She Goz

Partying with the artsy elite

The Foodie Soirée reminded me why I love living rooms

By Alex Zaragoza

Sitting on the hardwood floor of a total stranger's house and watching a performance in full swing just three feet away is not totally new to me. I've spent many nights sitting cross-legged on dingy-carpeted floors of dilapidated houses that had earned nicknames like The Sandwich House or The Suicide House.

There She Goz

In pursuit of useless information

Damn, it feels good to be a trivia geek

By Alex Zaragoza

The pursuit of stockpiling completely useless information is an art. Don't let anyone tell you different. Like any muscle that takes years of hard training and meticulous cultivation to be in top shape, the nerd muscle requires that same serial-killer-esque attention to detail.

There She Goz

Rising up and fighting back

A very short end-of-2014 list

By Alex Zaragoza

So, this is it, guys. We’re done. Another year in the books, and, as usual, you’ve most likely been bombarded with best-of and worst-of 2014 lists from websites, publications and your Facebook friends.

There She Goz

Tijuana’s Mini City wants your kids to buy, buy, buy

Children’s center is training tiny, adorable consumers

By Alex Zaragoza

Mini City is a children’s play place in Tijuana that encourages kids to play in a pretend city with a little grocery store, post office and other places for make-believe amusement. Sounds adorable, right?

There She Goz

No, I didn’t drop my smile

Turning the tables on the catcallers

By Alex Zaragoza

Dear catcallers of the world! No, I didn't drop my smile. No, I won't show you my tits. And while, yes, I may look fine as hell in my dress, I don't need you to tell me from your moving vehicle.

 
Close
Close
Close