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Shore Thing May 28, 2015

Enjoy free admission every Thursday night throughout the summer. Includes tours of Dear Nemesis, Nicole Eisenman 1993–2013, Roots Factory DJs, a cash bar, and a BYOP (bring your own picnic) option.

71 other events on Thursday, May 28
 
From the Editor
The taxpaying citizens of San Diego should not pay for a new stadium
Music feature
Providence duo are busting eardrums for the long haul
Seen Local
The media artist/designer wants women to challenge the idea of what’s expected of them
News
Lawsuit challenges city-funded nonprofit’s authority to make land-use decisions
Seen Local
The third in our series on the artists awarded grants through the Creative Catalyst Fund

 

 
 
Art & Culture

City Ballet's live-music programming on hiatus

The company's orchestra hits a 'bump in the road'

By Kinsee Morlan

 Just two weeks prior to City Ballet of San Diego's upcoming "Balanchine Spectacular," members of the City Ballet Orchestra were told that the company would have to cut the popular live-music component at this year's performances. 

Art & Culture

Head Crammers

Bombard your brain with these bits of brilliance

By CityBeat Staff

CityBeat staff recommends their current favorite pieces of pop-culture.

Art & Culture

Five must-read fantasy comic books and graphic novels

San Diego experts give the recommendations

By Alex Zaragoza

For those who’ve devoured George R.R. Martin’s novels and the TV series they inspired and are thirsty for more fantasy reads, local experts recommend five fantasy comic books.

Art & Culture

Watch this space

19 locations we’re keeping an eye on this year

By CityBeat Staff

Bread & Salt: The building at 1955 Julian Ave. in Logan Heights is bar-none the space for art to watch in the coming year. Public Architecture and Planning bought the 40,000-square-foot former Weber Bakery 10 months ago with plans to turn it into a community-focused center for the arts, says Public's James Brown.

Art & Culture

Andrew Printer wants the gay population to stop settling down

San Diego photographer's exhibition challenges the gay community to fight for the right not to marry

By Seth Combs

Photographer Andrew Printer’s exhibition challenges the gay community to fight for the right not to marry

Art & Culture

The show goes on for these two old clowns, Jerry Hager and Larry Keough

An end of old-school entertainment won’t stop these old pals from entertaining

By Kinsee Morlan

An end of old-school entertainment won’t stop these old pals from entertaining

Art & Culture

Some of San Diego's top designers

Our city might not be a Mecca, but it’s certainly got its share of design devotees

By Kinsee Morlan, Justin Roberts, AnnaMaria Stephens

San Diego might not be a Mecca, but it’s certainly got its share of design devotees

Art & Culture

David Cuzick and Meegan Nolan Cuzick are free as birds

The couple behind Magpie Gallery & Boutique are spreading their wings, closing shop and moving on

By Kinsee Morlan

The couple behind Magpie Gallery & Boutique are spreading their wings, closing shop and moving on

Art & Culture

Petals on parade

San Diego photographer exposes 'taboo' subject matter

By Claire Caraska

Artists have long loved the female nude. The female genitalia, on the other hand is a different story. That “area” has been largely ignored in art, usually hidden or simply left bare and nondescript like a Barbie doll's crotch.

Art & Culture

What a beautiful cataract you have

Making the case for the historic Pernicano's

By Troy Johnson

It's considered a gangrenous, hairy mole on the face of an otherwise gorgeous neighborhood—a leafy, STD fungus on Hillcrest's engorged metaphorical phallus of civic revitalization.

Arts & Culture feature

Just the tip

Should we stick a fork in restaurant gratuities?

By Michael A. Gardiner

It's a ritual restaurant diners experience regularly: The bill arrives and it's time to calculate the tip. But how? Should it be 10, 15 or 20 percent? And a percentage on what: Before or after tax? What about wine? 

Arts & Culture feature

San Diego kickboxer battling MS says sport liberated her

Determined to go pro, Ashley Curry hopes to inspire others struggling with the disease

By Joshua Emerson Smith

Curry was diagnosed with multiple sclerosis, or MS, an unpredictable disease that affects the central nervous system, disrupting the flow of information between the body and the brain.

Arts & Culture feature

Head Crammers

CityBeat staff dishes out our favorite books, apps and cultural tidbits

By CityBeat Staff

For voracious readers: It's been a turbulent time in the journalism business. Newspapers closing, or slashing staff, has been the norm for the last decade or so.

Arts & Culture feature

Drew Pollack's point of service

Acupuncturist donates time for the sick and injured in Mexico

By Tiffany Fox

Under a bridge near the Tijuana River, Carlos lay in a puddle of his own piss and shit. He was emaciated, too weak to sit up, and his friends said he'd been severely jaundiced in the days prior.

Arts & Culture feature

And then there was light

An abridged introduction to near-death experiences

By Amy Wallen

The International Society of Near Death Studies meets across the parking lot from the County Psychiatric Hospital, inside the Health and Human Services building.

Arts & Culture feature

Helen Redman paints the other side

San Diego artist celebrates life, death and motherhood

By Seth Combs

There are layers upon layers when it comes to the figurative works of Helen Redman. So many stories, so many voices. 

Arts & Culture feature

Head Crammers: Our favorite podcasts, TV shows, etc.

Bust your brain with this bunch of cultural baubles

By CityBeat Staff

There's an A&E show that's been on for a couple of weeks called The Returned. Skip it. Instead, watch Les Revenants, the French TV show it's based on.

Arts & Culture feature

Sara Solaimani wants local artists to cross boundaries, both internally and internationally

How a first-generation Iranian-American became a champion for the border arts scene

By Seth Combs

Sara Solaimani isn't Mexican. Not even close. That might be racially insensitive to point out within certain contexts, but in the case of Solaimani, it's understandable that some might mistake her for being a Chicana.

Arts & Culture feature

Change in the golden age of podcasting

KPBS Explore project reflects the evolving art of public media

By Kinsee Morlan

As the director of programming for both KPBS radio and television, John Decker is the guy to either blame or thank for switching up your local public-media-consumption routine.

Arts & Culture feature

FoundationForForm’s hands-on urban infill

Rising stars of San Diego's architect-as-developer movement mind the little details

By Kinsee Morlan

Standing in the central courtyard of the new North Park Post Office Lofts mixed-use development, the scene is reminiscent of M.C. Escher's famed "Relativity" print depicting several zigzagging sets of gravity-defying staircases.

City Week

From CityFest to Nerdcore Night

Our picks of San Diego events this week

By CityBeat Staff

Opening with a reception from 6 to 10 p.m. Friday, Aug. 13, Subtext Gallery’s Release the Kraken asked 30 artists to paint over vintage aquatic-themed works—those idyllic scenes of lakes, rivers and oceans that are ubiquitous at garage and estate sales—adding all manner of monsters and mythical sea-creatures.

City Week

From TNT to REDception

Our picks of San Diego events this week include MCASD's art party, a Brothers Grimm-inspired exhibition and more

By CityBeat Staff

Our picks of San Diego events this week include MCASD's art party, a Brothers Grimm-inspired exhibition and more

City Week

From The (In)Visible Project to GuyTunes

Our picks of San Diego events this week

By CityBeat Staff

Our picks of San Diego events this week's events includes a sensitive project that's giving faces and names to San Diego's homeless population and more

City Week

From 2011 Comic-Con events to a Vegan Beer Night

Our picks of San Diego events this week

By CityBeat Staff

Our picks of San Diego events this week

City Week

From San Diego LGBT Pride to the Truly Fabulous Hats Contest

Our picks of San Diego events this week include the annual pride parade and festival, opening day at Del Mar and more

By CityBeat Staff

Our picks of San Diego events this week include the annual pride parade and festival, opening day at Del Mar and more

City Week

From Over-the-Line to Lucid Dreams

Our picks of San Diego events this week include the annual OTL games, an interesting art show at Noel-Baza Fine Art and more

By CityBeat Staff

Our picks of San Diego events this week include the annual OTL games, an interesting art show at Noel-Baza Fine Art and more

City Week

From the Euphoria Brass Band to Tower After Hours

Our picks of San Diego events this week include a Nola-infused brass band, a Cuban-themed party and more

By CityBeat Staff

Our picks of San Diego events this week include a Nola-infused brass band, a Cuban-themed party and more

City Week

From Charles Glaubitz to a chili cook-off

Our picks of San Diego events this week include a mystical show at Subtext, the annual OB Street Fair and more

By CityBeat Staff

Our picks of San Diego events this week include a mystical show at Subtext, the annual OB Street Fair and more

City Week

From Power Animals at Voz Alta to World Refugee Day at MoPA

Our picks of this week's events include an art show in Barrio Logan and a new event celebrating refugees

By CityBeat Staff

Our picks of this week's events include an art show in Barrio Logan and a new event celebrating refugees

City Week

From the Latino Music Festival to SlutWalk San Diego

Our picks of this week's events include a music fest in Sherman Heights, a feminist-led march and more

By CityBeat Staff

Our picks of this week's events include a music fest in Sherman Heights, a feminist-led march and more

Film

'The Apu Trilogy' comes to San Diego

Satyajit Ray’s great series of dramas lead our rundown of movies screening around town

By Glenn Heath Jr.

Indian filmmaker Satyajit Ray began his career by making one of the great triptychs of all time: The Apu Trilogy, which consists of 1955’s Pather Panchali, 1957’s Aparajito and 1959’s The World of Apu.

Film

'The Seven Five' is an American tale of corruption

New documentary unravels history of malfeasance in the NYPD’s 75th precinct

By Glenn Heath Jr.

By exhibiting a heightened level of performance throughout The Seven Five, Dowd confirms his persona as an abrasive, stalwart, old-school vaudevillian who lived his professional life by a code of contradiction. 

Film

'Dark Star: H.R. Giger’s World' is a flaccid portrait of genius

New documentary about the famous painter and special effects guru

By Glenn Heath Jr.

Dark Star: H.R. Giger’s World, which opens Friday, May 22, at the Ken Cinema, remains content to simply sit back and listen rather than engage with the subject and his legendary canon of controversial work.

Film

'Good Kill' is a lousy and patronizing character study

Andrew Niccol’s toothless drama about drones simplifies the human cost of war

By Glenn Heath Jr.

A flagrant attempt to cash in on the political discussion over drone use in foreign wars, Andrew Niccol’s Good Kill patronizes the audience with grandstanding sensationalism and rhetoric

Film

'Iris' is a loving and leisurely portrait of a style maven

Documentary about Iris Apfel leads our rundown of movies screening around town

By Glenn Heath Jr.

Odds are Iris Apfel is going to outlive us all. The legendary interior decorator/costume designer/ style maverick has worked in the fashion industry for more than six decades.

Film

In 'Saint Laurent,' life’s a surreal catwalk

Bertrand Bonello’s biopic fragments history to find the emotion of style

By Glenn Heath Jr.

By the end of Saint Laurent, which opens Friday, May 15, the active viewer has given up on trying to understand the myth and become infatuated with simply watching the man and his experiences cascade through time.

Film

Our sort-of summer movie preview

Only a few releases from the next three months sound promising

By Glenn Heath Jr.

It’s common practice for film critics to write an annual Summer Movie Preview to survey the onslaught of big budget sequels, prequels, tent-poles and remakes to come.

Film

On screen this week

Here are the openings and other showings going on in San Diego

By Glenn Heath Jr.

About Elly: While on a picnic in the north of Iran, a kindergarten teacher disappears, leaving her friends distraught with panic. From director Asghar Farhadi (A Separation).  

Film

'Tangerines' and the power of words over war

Georgian drama leads rundown of movies screening around town

By Glenn Heath Jr.

The dark-horse nominee for Best Foreign Language film at this past year’s Academy Awards, Tangerines takes place in 1992 deep within the disputed Caucasus mountain territory of Abkhazia where war rages between the Georgian military and Russian-backed locals. 

Film

'Avengers: Age of Ultron' tediously offers more of the same

Engaging new villains outperform Marvel’s favorite super straw men and women

By Glenn Heath Jr.

The first Avengers film used cinematic space to explore the tension between competing egos and superpowers. Age of Ultron’s opening sequence indicates just how banal this outing will be.

No Life Offline

The essential podcast collection

The best of the best voices to pound on your eardrums

By Dave Maass

Podcasts are undergoing a whole new phase of growth. For years, podcasts have largely been stand-alone shows, either recorded out of someone's garage or introduced as a peripheral product attached to another news magazine or TV show.

No Life Offline

Is it time to be ashamed for shaming?

Jon Ronson looks inward in 'So, You’ve Been Publicly Shamed'

By Dave Maass

With his latest book, So, You've Been Publicly Shamed, Ronson examines how perpetrators of relatively minor errors of judgment become the victims of immense Internet pile-ons.

No Life Offline

Out-of-body experiences

Have fun with inexpensive virtual reality apps

By Dave Maass

While Oculus Rift may ultimately be a more sophisticated device, this cheaper solution provides a window into, not only new environments, but the very future.

No Life Offline

WWWedding planning

Three sites my fiancée and I are using to plan this union

By Dave Maass

This summer, I'm getting married to the woman I was looking for all my life. It's true: Nothing so far that I've encountered on the Internet has been as bewildering and exhausting as wedding planning. Invitations? Registries? Our own wedding URL? 

No Life Offline

Computers at the California Capitol

How state legislators hope to regulate the Internet this session

By Dave Maass

Each session, lawmakers also attempt to quite literally change how computers work in California, with bills on everything from online commerce to state-funded pilot projects.

No Life Offline

Video games you should’ve gotten for the holidays

Four awesome products for your console and smartphone

By Dave Maass

That's why I love video games: All the stimuli are there in one medium that keeps my brain and fingers busy. Here are four games that came out late last year that kept my hands from idling

No Life Offline

High-resolution resolutions for 2015

What I’d like to change about my digital life this year

By Dave Maass

By now, we can all agree that New Year's resolutions are about as likely to come true as the wishes you make when you blow out your birthday candles.

No Life Offline

The worst online behavior of 2014

I could only count to three before running out of F-bombs

By Dave Maass

Sitting down to catalog all my complaints about the online world in 2014, I desperately wanted to orchestrate a way to put Taylor Swift at the top of the list.


No Life Offline

The year in San Diego cybercrime, part 2

Your semi-annual police-blotter round-up of digital-age malfeasance

By Dave Maass

There’s a whole class of invisible, digital crimes that aren’t going out over the emergency airwaves. No one’s dialing 911 for data breaches, and patrol officers aren’t calling for backup on scam emails. 

No Life Offline

If you were my sugar cyber-Santa

These are the top-dollar tech gifts (and a couple cheap ones) I want this December

By Dave Maass

I'm the elf who's making sure Santa doesn't leave you a snowflake sweater that might as well have been bedazzled with chunks of coal from a miner's black lungs. I recommend you either lay this issue of CityBeat folded open above the toilet or leave this column open on your web browser for your lover to see.

On the Cover

On the cover: Carolyn Ramos

CityBeat's art director tips well for this week's cover

By CityBeat Staff

New CityBeat art director Carolyn Ramos gets kudos for the cover two weeks in a row. She read Michael Gardiner’s feature story about how local restaurants are considering using flat service charges instead of traditional tipping for servers.

On the Cover

On the cover: Carolyn Ramos

CityBeat's art director designed our Summer Guide

By CityBeat Staff

New CityBeat art director Carolyn Ramos created this week’s whimsical cover illustration.

On the Cover

On the cover: Jeff Corrigan

San Diego photographer shoots kickboxer Ashley Curry for this week's cover

By CityBeat Staff

Photographer Jeff “Turbo” Corrigan drew on his previous experience shooting sports to photograph this week’s cover of kickboxer Ashley Curry sparring at Undisputed North Park.

On the Cover

On the Cover: Merri Sutton

Washington photographer shot this week's cover, featuring The Sonics

By CityBeat Staff

This week’s cover design features a collage of photos of legendary Tacoma garage rock band The Sonics, who formed more than 50 years ago, and just released their first album since the 1960s, This Is the Sonics.

On the Cover

On the cover: Jamie Dickerson

Photographer captured Drew Pollack for our cover

The cover photograph of Good Samaritan acupuncturist Drew Pollack was shot by University of San Diego grad Jamie Dickerson.

On the Cover

One the cover: Michael Rubenstein

NYC photographer captured Waxahatchee

Michael Rubenstein photographed this week’s cover subject, Katie Crutchfield, aka Waxahatchee. Based in New York City, Rubenstein has taken photographs for The New York Times, Wall Street Journal, Yahoo! and Nike.

On the Cover

On the cover: Jeff 'Turbo' Corrigan

Photographer captured Council Brewing Co. head brewer Liz Chism

Veteran San Diego photographer Jeff "Turbo" Corrigan captured the essence of the industry for our special Beer Issue, including the cover shot of Council Brewing Co. head brewer Liz Chism.

On the Cover

On the cover: Emma Elizabeth Tillman

Meet the photographer who shot Father John Misty

Emma Elizabeth Tillman, pictured here with her husband, John Tillman (Father John Misty), photographed this week's cover shot of the musical artist. 

On the Cover

On the cover: Joshua Emerson Smith

CityBeat staff writer uses Nikon D200

San Diego CityBeat staff writer Joshua Emerson Smith photographed Bill Powers at his home in University Heights for this week's cover news feature, which looks at the electrical engineer's quest to create an affordable, off-the-grid solar-energy system

Seen Local

A Ship in the Woods set to sail away to lands unknown

After four years, the Del Mar “culture capitalists” to focus on curating and finding a new home

By Seth Combs

Burning ships. A fitting description considering the show the brothers are participating in, Conquest, Control, Confinement, will be the second to last show at A Ship in the Woods house.

Seen Local

The Artist Odyssey is ready for their close-up

The 'artist documentary network' hopes viewers are willing to pay to watch expertly crafted art docs

By Seth Combs

The Artist Odyssey (TAO) founder Chris Fessenden is more than aware that, when it comes to video these days, a lot of people expect to get it for free.

Seen Local

Future uncertain for UCSD’s University Art Gallery

After nearly 50 years, faculty and staff fear next two shows will be the last for a while

By Seth Combs

Merete Kjaer received her notice on April 15. The assistant director at the UC San Diego University Art Gallery is being let go, because, as she tells it, the visual arts faculty and the new dean of Arts and Humanities couldn't agree on a way to keep funding for the gallery. 

Seen Local

Noè Olivas channels his automotive love into a kid-friendly art space

The third in our series on the artists awarded grants through the Creative Catalyst Fund

By Seth Combs

Noè Olivas has always had an interest in all things automotive. Way before becoming a full-time artist, he was considered a life as a mechanic.  "I actually didn't want to go to college at fir

Seen Local

Grant Kester is ready to get critical

The UC San Diego prof’s new journal and website focuses on the mediums outside the standard gallery spaces

By Seth Combs

To hear Grant Kester tell it, he's been planning this for decades. "I've been writing about various forms of activist and socially-based art forms for probably 25 years," says the UC San Diego professor of art history, who also has a background in art journalism.

Seen Local

Arzu Ozkal’s 'Home Affairs' is about more than motherhood

The media artist/designer wants women to challenge the idea of what’s expected of them

By Seth Combs

Arzu Ozkal's journey thus far has been one of artistic defiance. Most of her video work, graphic design and performance pieces have been decisive statements against male-centric totalitarianism and patriarchal value systems.

Seen Local

Kim Stringfellow finds beauty in an otherwise bleak landscape

The photographer and videographer’s 'Mojave Project' is chosen for a Guggenheim Fellowship

By Seth Combs

When the John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation announced this year's fellowship grants, three San Diego artists were on the list.

Seen Local

Drawing from within

Andrew McNamara’s subjects are aesthetically beautiful, but it’s what’s inside that counts

By Seth Combs

As almost any artist can attest, inspiration can strike at the most unexpected time. To hear La Mesa artist Andrew McNamara tell it, there was a time where he wasn't sure if he wanted to pursue a career in drawing.

Seen Local

Andrea Chung pays homage to working class heroes

The mixed-media artist addresses the political, historical and controversial in her subtly broad works

By Seth Combs

Andrea Chung is used to the misconceptions by now. Take her name, for example. She admits that when people first meet her, they often think they'll be meeting someone who looks, well, more Asian. 

Seen Local

'La Mona' shows her true colors

The iconic Tijuana statue gets a colorful makeover, but not for long.

By Seth Combs

Armando Muñoz Garcia has always had a reputation for doing what he wants. Back in 1987, Garcia, then an eager art student, approached the city of Tijuana about building a statue of a giant nude woman to commemorate the city's centenary. 

The Short List

LGBT Film Festival, Arts & Amps & more

Our top picks of San Diego events this week

For nearly two decades, FilmOut San Diego has done a stellar job of spotlighting under-the-radar, LGBT-focused cinema that may have otherwise never been seen on the big screen.

The Short List

A bunch of summer parties, Rosarito Art Fest & more

Our top picks of San Diego events this week

A three-day weekend is like a gift from the Gods. When it comes to Memorial Day weekend, it usually signifies summer is officially here and everybody and their mama will be having some kind of backyard BBQ or pool party.

The Short List

Snakeskin, Bike to Work Day 2015 & more

Our top picks of San Diego events this week

Let's face it: Modern dance isn't for everyone. However, if there's one dance company in the local scene that's managed to bridge the gap between cerebral and accessible, it's John Malashock.

The Short List

Creative Block, Bacon & Barrels & more

Our top picks of San Diego events this week

A couple months ago we profiled Cohort Collective, a "Who's Who" of local artists and curators that includes Spenser Little, Exist 1981, NEKO, Carly Ealey and more. 

The Short List

Independent Bookstore Day, In Bloom Market & more

Our top picks of San Diego events this week

Many of us have long since transitioned to reading books via Kindle or other tablet formats, but there's still nothing quite so satisfying as cracking open the spine of a book and flipping through the pages of a good story.

The Short List

PLACAS: The Most Dangerous Tattoo, Adams Avenue Unplugged & more

Our top picks of San Diego events this week

Themes of redemption, transformation and hope abound in Paul Flores’ haunting new play, PLACAS: The Most Dangerous Tattoo.

The Short List

A bunch of food events, Self-Taught Genius & more

Our top picks of San Diego events this week

It's a good week to be a foodie. Not one, not two, not three, but four separate edible events have us salivating on our keyboards.

The Short List

Monster Drawing Rally, Live Arts Fest 2015 & more

Our top picks of San Diego events this week

We had a blast at the last Monster Drawing Rally back in September, but the name is a bit of a misnomer. Inspired by the Southern Exposure event in San Francisco, one could easily get the impression that people were just drawing monsters.

The Short List

Faust Fest 2015, Springfest & more

Our top picks of San Diego events this week

It's been a decade since a San Diego police officer shot and killed Jacob Faust, believing the 25-year-old musician and puppeteer was reaching for a gun in the back of his car.

The Short List

Authorized Mythologies, Bikes & Beers SD & more

Our top picks of San Diego events this week

Take a journey into the mind of the pickup artist, the player. Is womanizing a learned behavior or a proclivity some guys are just born with?

Theater

Super-sized drama at Cygnet Theater

Samuel D. Hunter’s 'The Whale' is a big story about love and death

By David L. Coddon

Samuel D. Hunter's The Whale is an uneasy spectator experience: two hours without intermission in the presence of a 600-pound character, Charlie, who’s been eating himself to death in the aftermath of his lover, Alan, having starved himself to death.

Theater

'Arms and the Man' skewers love and war

George Bernard Shaw’s comedy delights at Old Globe

By David L. Coddon

With its sumptuous 19th-century costumes (designed by David Israel Reynoso) and applause-eliciting sets (scenic design by Ralph Funicello), the Old Globe’s production of George Bernard Shaw’s Arms and the Man has pizzazz to spare.

Theater

'Cabaret' pulls no punches

Classic play elicits gasps at Welk Resort Theater In Escondido

By David L. Coddon

If you’ve never experienced Cabaret in person—in other words, your only reference point is the 1972 movie—then you really haven’t experienced Cabaret at all.

Theater

'Lesson 443' offers lessons in letting go

Tatiana Suarez-Pico's play premieres at Moxie Theatre in Rolando

By David L. Coddon

The evolution of theater in San Diego, and the burnishing of its reputation, depends on theaters—beyond just the Old Globe and La Jolla Playhouse—presenting world-premiere works. 

Theater

Anxieties, insights reside in 'Uncanny Valley'

Artificial intelligence cleverly portrayed at San Diego Repertory Theatre

By David L. Coddon

If thinking about artificial intelligence or the idea of downloading human consciousness freaks you out, or, if you’re prone to free-floating anxiety, Uncanny Valley probably isn’t for you.

Theater

'Unnecessary Farce' is a raucous ride

North Coast Rep show lets cast go berserk

By David L. Coddon

Playwright Paul Slade Smith’s Unnecessary Farce is a comedy about... forget it, details of the plot are unnecessary. 

Theater

Surviving 'Lord of the Flies'

Stage adaption of classic novel gains late speed

By David L. Coddon

Like William Golding’s 1954 novel, obligatory reading for every high school English student, Nigel Williams’ 1991 stage adaptation of Lord of the Flies founders a bit until the young boys stranded on an island turn savage.

Theater

Family ties strained in 'Sunset Park'

Comedy wrangles over caring for elderly parents

By David L. Coddon

Sunset Park is a neighborhood in Brooklyn, but it also sounds like the name of a nursing home, doesn't it? A place to spend the sunset years of one's evaporating life. This analogy doesn't come out of a clear blue sky. 

Theater

Style trumps story in 'The White Snake'

Old Globe production is fairytale and visual feast

By David L. Coddon

Charming and resplendent, The White Snake is both fairytale and visual feast. If you’re interested in greater substance than that, you’ll have to wait until the very end of the 100-minute-long, one-act production.

Theater

My Fair Lady a loverly night at the theater

Cygnet Theatre stages adventurous rendition of the venerable Lerner & Loewe show

By David L. Coddon

You can’t do justice to a production of My Fair Lady, the Broadway classic that doesn’t have a dud song in its entire musical score, without a full orchestra, right?

Urban Scout

Makers Arcade highlights San Diego talent

Nine vendors who caught our eye at the recent indie craft fest

By Hannah More

To describe Makers Arcade as a "craft fair" would be an undersell.

Urban Scout

Last-minute holiday gifts

A dozen ideas for the perfect present

By Hannah More

As I'm writing this, there are 10 shopping days left before Dec. 25. And you're probably reading it with fewer than that. Stop panicking! That's tons of time, and here are a dozen ideas.

Urban Scout

Making San Diego museum stores part of your retail world

Design-minded goods from The Library Shop, Low Gallery, Mingei and MCASD's X Store

By Hannah More

When I travel, I make it a point to hit up museum gift shops—sometimes without visiting the museum itself. Am I missing out on a significant cultural experience and falling victim to consumerism?

Urban Scout

Newish places in San Diego to drop some cash

A survey of fresh independent shops in Hillcrest, North Park, University Heights and Mission Hills

By Hannah More

Here are five cool shops, all in the Uptown-ish part of San Diego (we'll get to you, next, North County) that are worth some of your coin.

Urban Scout

San Diego County retailers to follow on Instagram

Four businesses that show their stuff with lovely images

By Nina Sachdev Hoffmann

Instagram is a glorious tool for stalking other people's cute baby and cat pics, and it's also really addictive if you like food and food porn.

Urban Scout

Designer spotlight: Heather Barnes, Stoneywear Designs

One-time interior-design student’s become an accomplished silversmith and jewelry maker

By Nina Sachdev Hoffmann

I'm totally hooked on Stoneywear Designs, the handmade jewelry line by Heather Barnes, whose skills in silversmithing and spotting the next big trend make her a go-to for great jewelry. 

Urban Scout

Snackavore’s delight

Vegan cookies, addictive toffee and more treats by SoCal companies

By Nina Sachdev Hoffmann

I'm always advocating for buying goods and services from the people who live and work in your community. Food is no different. 

Urban Scout

Shopping in Carlsbad Village

An evening stroll yields some retail scores

By Nina Sachdev Hoffmann

I really enjoyed my early evening stroll down Carlsbad Village Drive and environs last week. OK, maybe that was the freedom talking.

Urban Scout

Found! pop-up shop's ‘miscellaneous whatchamacallits’

Barry Bell and Mark Quint peddle strange and wonderful stuff at their occasional sales

By Nina Sachdev Hoffmann

With real estate what it is these days, pop-up shops are becoming more and more attractive to small, local retailers.

Urban Scout

Blue Dot offers an eco-friendly way to get clean

Ocean Beach refill shop helps you keep plastics out of landfills

By Nina Sachdev Hoffmann

Owner of Blue Dot Refill (4799 1/2 Voltaire St. in Ocean Beach)—a small, no-frills refill shop for all your laundry, bathing and general cleaning needs—has made it her mission to reduce plastics pollution, one bottle at a time.

 
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