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Make it Snow: A Holiday Reading Show Dec 20, 2014 The Radvocate Magazine is holding a special holiday reading show featuring Juliet Escoria, Scott McClanahan, Ryan Bradford, Lucy Tiven, Jos Charles and more. 77 other events on Saturday, December 20
 
Sordid Tales
How can so many people be wrong about something for so long?
There She Goz
Children’s center is training tiny, adorable consumers
Seen Local
City takes a slow and careful approach to the public-art gem
News
Rosemary Summers succeeded in 2013, and her parents want justice
The World Fare
Kearny Mesa Chinese place serves the best potstickers and xiao long bao in town

 

 
 
Backwards & in High Heels

Ebony and ivory and harmony, oh my!

Stop pretending an interracial hug fixes injustice

By Aaryn Belfer

In the days between two grotesque and revealing grand-jury decisions not to indict the killers of two unarmed black men, a photo of a white policeman embracing a weeping black boy kept popping up in my Facebook feed.

Backwards & in High Heels

Self-medicating through trashy art

Taylor Swift and ‘The Good Wife’: just two of my guilty pleasures

By Aaryn Belfer

Here’s the stone-cold truth: I’m into some superficial entertainment right now. Various news items engulf me like an avalanche: President Obama finding his immigration balls a month too late; frat boys across the country getting away with rape, ho hum.

Backwards & in High Heels

Going nuclear

An experiment in not exercising a hard-won fundamental right

By Aaryn Belfer

On this most recent Election Day, the one that saw the U.S. Senate floor—and those of some governor's mansions and local Podunk cubicles across the country—get scrubbed clean with the asses of Democrats, I did something that pissed off pretty much everyone I know, and a whole bunch of someones I don't: I stayed home.

Backwards & in High Heels

Encinitas’ Prop. F and the dispensaries

Let’s move this time machine to 2014, shall we?

By Aaryn Belfer

I don’t live anywhere near Encinitas. But a lovely, graceful, terrific writer friend of mine does, and, last week, she—a cancer survivor and user of medicinal marijuana herself—drafted a lovely, graceful, terrific letter to some local publications about Prop. F. More specifically, it was about her opposition to it.

Backwards & in High Heels

How not to run a marathon

Zero-2-couch in 10 easy weeks

By Aaryn Belfer

Too many people have been turned off to not running a marathon simply by trying to start off too fast. Their bodies rebel and they wind up in a mental funk, wondering why anyone would possibly want to not run in the first place.

Backwards & in High Heels

Winter is coming

The Southern California preppers edition

By Aaryn Belfer

Wow, was that a summer or what? I don't know about you, but in my 22 years of living in this casual little city that's trying on fancy britches, I cannot recall a hotter five months. 

Backwards & in High Heels

The iWatch is more iExtraordinary than you’ve imagined

From real-time-death notification to hot-flash tabulation, it does it all

By Aaryn Belfer

As the winner of an online sweepstakes (I stumbled onto it when I mistyped a url while shopping), I got to test drive the new iWatch for a week and am therefore in a unique position to weigh in on the attributes of this game-changing device.

Backwards & in High Heels

Ice buckets and social justice

Can we do more than one thing at a time?

By Aaryn Belfer

When I was finally able to turn my focus to the fundraiser, I didn't have high hopes for it. Either dump water or write a check as a strategy seemed misguided. Why isn't it both? I thought. 

Backwards & in High Heels

To my white tribe

You are mine, and I am yours, so let’s deal with it

By Aaryn Belfer

White people like you and me, dear CityBeat reader, have the privilege not to deal with any of the race realities if we don't want to.

Backwards & in High Heels

Deporting refugees and welcoming Ebola

America and her priorities

By Aaryn Belfer

Now for a whole bunch of words: Fever, vomiting, diarrhea, bleeding from every orifice, death, no cure. Also: The World Health Organization has warned that the virus is spreading faster than efforts to control it.

Because I Said So

Pride and publicity

Of profits, promotions, parades and pandering

By Tony Phillips

San Diego's 32nd Annual Lesbian Gay Bisexual Transgender (LGBT) Pride Celebration got underway last Saturday with a parade that passed in front of my house. Location, location, location.

Crossword

Crossword: 'Broken records'

CityBeat's weekly puzzle

By Brendan Emmett Quigley

 Across 1. You might get one for being a different person 6. Stare at from across the room 10. Base folks: Abbr. 14. Big mess 15. Like many a catfish relationship 16. ___ Might Be Gi

Crossword

Crossword: 'Battle of the bands'

CityBeat's weekly puzzle

By Brendan Emmett Quigley

CityBeat's weekly crossword puzzle written by Brendan Emmett Quigley.

Crossword

Crossword: 'Orange in the new black'

CityBeat's weekly puzzle

By Brendan Emmett Quigley

Across 1. Machu Picchu native 5. Chevy full-sized sedan 11. Big name in cosmetics 14. Chicken’s home 15. May baby, usually 16. First Steely Dan album to win a Grammy 17. Aquarium denizen wit

Editor's Note

Carl DeMaio and difficult decisions

Absolute certainty amid scandal allegations is elusive, so voters will have to go with their gut

By David Rolland

I knew enough about Filner that the accusations against him didn’t surprise me. I know enough about DeMaio that Bosnich’s claims don’t surprise me, either.

Editor's Note

Emma Watson, feminism and the fight

Being a feminist never seemed all that complicated to me

By David Rolland

Of all the important words spoken by actor Emma Watson in her speech on feminism to the United Nations on Sept. 20, the line that jumped out at me was this: “I decided that I was a feminist, and this seemed uncomplicated to me.”

Editor's Note

Dreaming of a new Cabrillo Bridge

Wouldn’t it be great to find a non-catastrophic way to close that span to cars?

By David Rolland

The bridge closure provided a great opportunity to test those theories and to study the full impact of the shutdown on the park, its institutions and the surrounding areas, and I’m eager to see what the city learned.

Editor's Note

SeaWorld: one guy’s take

I don’t really go for the caged-wildlife thing to begin with

By David Rolland

Richard Bloom, a Democrat who represents the Santa Monica area, wants to ban public entertainment involving killer whales, end the captive breeding of whales, bar companies from importing or exporting whales and move SeaWorld’s 10 whales into ocean pens. 

Editor's Note

An open letter to Bob Filner

How can you bear going on like this?

By David Rolland

You might learn to be more respectful of women, but the damage is done. You might survive a recall process, but only on technicalities. If a vote were held today on whether you should be mayor, you’d get killed.

Editor's Note

Anders Wright and Peter Holslin leaving CityBeat

Longtimers on the way out; three new guys coming in

By David Rolland

This issue marks the final one with Peter Holslin as music editor and Anders Wright as film editor. I know!

Editor's Note

The Dave Maass Era ends

Goodbye to perhaps San Diego’s best investigative reporter

By David Rolland

Lots of San Diegans have wanted Dave Maass to Shut! Up!—mostly those who find themselves in his argumentative crosshairs on Twitter. He certainly has a way about him.

Editor's Note

Reunions and elections

My necessary weekend getaway to the past

By David Rolland

I’m sitting on a bench at my alma mater Calabasas High School. I’m looking over toward a walkway leading down from the softball field where I lost consciousness after Matt Behrens and I collided with each other on a pop fly.

Editor's Note

Goodbye, Gloria Penner

KPBS icon’s impact on CityBeat

By David Rolland

San Diego lost one of its most well-known and important figures on Saturday, when journalist Gloria Penner succumbed to the cancer she’d been battling for more than a year.

Editor's Note

Adios, Aaryn Belfer

One of our longtime columnists calls it quits

By David Rolland

Aaryn Belfer’s biweekly “Backwards & in High Heels” column first appeared in CityBeat’s Jan. 24, 2007. Her last column for us appears in this issue. 

Editorial

The ballad of Sherri and Todd

Assessing the Republicans’ ouster of the San Diego City Council president

By CityBeat Staff

Two weeks ago, we published an editorial urging San Diego City Councilmember Sherri Lightner to "stand down" amid a Republican scheme to install her as council president and end the reign of Todd Gloria.

Editorial

Bonnie Dumanis, Todd Gloria and SDSU frat boys

Some bad behavior all around

By CityBeat Staff

Let’s start this week with a pat on the back for U-T San Diego’s Greg Moran, who didn’t stop reporting on the reelection of San Diego County District Attorney Bonnie Dumanis after the reelection of Bonnie Dumanis.

Editorial

Stand down, Sherri Lightner

Republicans are reportedly backing her for City Council President, but she should decline

By CityBeat Staff

Wendy Fry of NBC 7 reported Monday that the Republicans on the San Diego City Council are orchestrating a coup to oust Todd Gloria as council president.

Editorial

UC tuition hike is not part of the plan

Increasing cost to students imperils the underpinnings of California’s system of higher education

By CityBeat Staff

The California Master Plan for Higher Education of 1960 is an amazing thing—a monumental thing that we doubt would ever get accomplished these days. 

Editorial

The deal with Todd Bosnich

What we know about the guy who did his damnedest to destroy Carl DeMaio

By CityBeat Staff

Todd Bosnich may or may not have sunk Carl DeMaio’s hopes of unseating Congressmember Scott Peters. But the former policy director for the DeMaio campaign certainly gave it his all.

Editorial

The evidence against Scott Peters

Everybody just calm down

By CityBeat Staff

Possessing more than passable understanding of elementary arithmetic, Carl DeMaio on Sunday decided it was finally necessary for him to concede failure in his aggressive attempt to unseat Rep. Scott Peters. 

Editorial

How Jim Holman thinks

Reader publisher is terrified about ‘radical homosexual agenda’ and ‘genderless society’

By CityBeat Staff

It's been a good long time since we've told you folks about what Jim Holman's been up to. Holman, you might recall, is the publisher of the San Diego ReaderCityBeat's competition in San Diego's alternative-newsweekly market.

Editorial

CityBeat’s clip-out endorsement guide

Bring it with you on Nov. 4

By CityBeat Staff

If you’re still an Election Day voter, clip out this guide and take it with you on Nov. 4.

Editorial

Parsing the Carl DeMaio scandals

An update on the controversies dogging the candidate’s campaign

By CityBeat Staff

After San Diego County District Attorney Bonnie Dumanis and San Diego Police Chief Shelley Zimmerman released statements on Monday saying they’d completed their investigations in a couple of matters involving controversy magnet Carl DeMaio, there was so much parsing of words.

Editorial

CityBeat’s Nov. 4 election endorsements

From San Diego City Council and Congress to Secretary of State and all the proposition, we have your ballot covered

By CityBeat Staff

 Monday, Oct. 6, was the first day of by-mail voting for the Nov. 4 election. As always, we have opinions on everything on the ballot. Let’s get to it.

Letters

Letters to the editor

Our readers tell us what they think

Regarding your Nov. 12 editorial: I think we’re done with Carl DeMaio and should move on. The people have spoken and re-elected Congressman Scott Peters.

Letters

Letters to the editor

Our readers tell us what they think

Thank you for your awesome coverage of elections and endorsements [“Editorial,” Oct. 8] that I couldn’t vote without!

Letters

Letters to the editor

Our readers tell us what they think

Thank you for your Oct. 22 editorial about Carl DeMaio. I have found him to be very unreliable in the interviews and other things I have read and watched.

Letters

Letters to the editor

Our readers tell us what they think

I agree with the content and suppositions of your Oct. 22 editorial about Carl DeMaio, and I’m a conservative Republican who ordinarily would be voting along the party line. 

Letters

Letters to the editor

Our readers tell us what they think

Aaryn Belfer’s admonition in her Aug. 20 “Backwards & in High Heels” column—“All white people... should be in serious dialogue” about racism— is predicable.

Letters

Letters to the editor

Our readers tell us what they think

In reviewing Jyoti-Bihanga on Aug. 20, Mina Riazi ["One Lucky Spoon"] strayed from her field of expertise (restaurants) into areas where she seems ill-informed or misled by tainted sources.

Letters

Letters to the editor

Our readers tell us what they think

Poor Aaryn, searching for pity because of alienation by us “white tribe members,” including her so-called friends who avoid her or are questioning their friendship with her.

Letters

Letters to the editor

Our readers tell us what they think

Thank you for writing about the struggles of the mentally ill who are trapped in the criminal justice system [Cover story, Aug. 27]. The narrative gives a good description of the anguish and frustration that families face with adult children with serious mental illness.

Letters

Letters to the editor

Our readers tell us what they think

Kelly Davis’ piece on mentally ill criminals [Cover story,” Aug. 27] made us cry. We felt this article, so well-written and -researched, sadly informed us regarding the legal (while inferring the moral and spiritual) status of those poor “lost” souls.

Letters

Letters to the editor

Our readers tell us what they think

The Arts do it all  I'm writing in response to the two-part series by Kinsee Morlan about the arts in our county ["Art & Culture," Aug. 6 and 13]. I think our request is to show ho

Political Lunacy

Haven't we been here before?

In San Diego politics, the frame of the game stays the same

By Carl Luna

In San Diego politics, the frame of the game stays the same

Political Lunacy

San Diego song

City may have passed a pain-free budget, but it has a bigger hole in it than Henry’s bucket

By Carl Luna

City may have passed a pain-free budget, but it has a bigger hole in it than Henry’s bucket

Political Lunacy

In lieu of flowers

A eulogy for departed City Attorney Mike Aguirre

By Carl Luna

A eulogy for departed City Attorney Mike Aguirre

Political Lunacy

Black hole in the sun

Why would anyone want to be a member of the San Diego City Council?

By Carl Luna

Why would anyone want to be a member of the San Diego City Council?

Political Lunacy

On to the 19th century!

You can’t fight City Hall—but you can fight retro plans to build a new one

By Carl Luna

You can’t fight City Hall—but you can fight retro plans to build a new one

Political Lunacy

An odd year

Elections in odd-numbered council districts and an odd trio challenging an odd city attorney make for odd times

By Carl Luna

Elections in odd-numbered council districts and an odd trio challenging an odd city attorney make for odd times

Political Lunacy

Light the candles

Even small wars cost a lot to raise these days

By Carl Luna

Even small wars cost a lot to raise these days

Political Lunacy

Tijuana burns

Our neighbor's house is on fire--and no one seems to give a damn

By Carl Luna

Our neighbor's house is on fire--and no one seems to give a damn

Political Lunacy

It's really not so bad

From financial woes to flaming fires, plagues of problems bedeviled San Diego in 2007, but we go on

By Carl Luna

From financial woes to flaming fires, plagues of problems bedeviled San Diego in 2007, but we muddled on

Political Lunacy

The fall of Mike Aguirre

Can the city attorney survive the autumn of his discontent?

By Carl Luna

Can the city attorney survive the autumn of his discontent?

Presently Tense

I'm tense no more

Out with this old column, in with a new one

By D.A. Kolodenko

Having grown up in San Diego seeing so many creative, smart people move to Los Angeles, San Francisco, New York, Europe and other, less-deserty pastures, I always admired those who stayed, or relocated, here for their resolve to make it work in a town where picking up a newspaper is less popular than applying zinc oxide to the nasal region.

Presently Tense

How may I help you?

Providing a different kind of tech support

By D.A. Kolodenko

Punya and Abhijeet, both in their late 20s, told me they were the only two guys from hundreds in the company’s Bangalore office who’d been sent to San Diego for training. So, these were the voices on the phone! I had come face to face with the living, breathing targets of every joke ever told in the U.S. about trying to get a modem fixed.

Presently Tense

Cuckoo world

My admiration for a local antiques collector

By D.A. Kolodenko

Long before the Gaslamp Quarter became the gentrified playground of San Diego’s young 9-to-5ers, there was this giant antique mall down there, south of Market.

Presently Tense

Sleepless in San Diego

Where can a night owl go for a hoot

By D.A. Kolodenko

If New York is the city that never sleeps, San Diego is the city that has a glass of warm soymilk before tucking itself into bed at 8:30.Sure, you’ve got your weekend Pacific Beach bro-fest, your

Presently Tense

The politics of dancing

Shaking up the meaning of an American memorial

By D.A. Kolodenko

Five people were arrested on Saturday for dancing at the Jefferson Memorial in Washington, D.C.

Presently Tense

A view of the bridge

Balboa Park’s future in the grand scheme of things

By D.A. Kolodenko

I’m sure you’ve heard about Irwin Jacobs’ plan to invest in a park renovation that would remove cars from the Plaza De Panama in the heart of the park and divert traffic coming off of the Cabrillo Bridge toward other parking areas.

Presently Tense

Bird of sacrifice

Pelicans are large and in charge, but their future is murky

By D.A. Kolodenko

Living smack in front of the tide pools in O.B. for 11 years will make an amateur pelican expert out of you, and it occurs to me that this year, something looks different.

Presently Tense

Roe v. Wade on hold

Facing the erosion of abortion rights in America

By D.A. Kolodenko

It’s already happening across the country. The New York Times reported that since Republicans made gains in the mid-term elections, 29 states now have anti-choice governors and 15 have both anti-choice governors and legislatures.

Presently Tense

Nukikazes wanted

Japan’s crisis offers a glowing opportunity

By D.A. Kolodenko

One of the more interesting yet under-reported stories from the ongoing disaster in Japan is about how the Tokyo Electric Power Company has ramped up its effort to find workers willing to brave the dangerous conditions at the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear plant.

Presently Tense

Meltdown versus shutdown

Let’s stop sucking the nuclear boobs

By D.A. Kolodenko

Shut down San Onofre Nuclear Power Plant! If enough of us demand it, it will happen. Raise your voices! Send letters! Organize a demonstration! Walk like an Egyptian!

Shenanigans

Shenanigans: The search is over

Staff writer Dave Maass is leaving; can you find 22 of his favorite subjects?

By Dave Maass

Bill Horn, marijuana, Occupy SD, Zany-Zane and Gary Kreep were among our beloved staff writer's favorite topics. 

Shenanigans

Shenanigans: Black History mini-crossword

Fill in the blanks with prominent African-American figures

By Dave Maass

Who is the current Assembly member for District 79? Plus more questions involving prominent African-American San Diegans. 

Shenanigans

Shenanigans: Flu hunt

Can you find nine flu symptoms and the six FDA-approved vaccines?

By Dave Maass

A list of the six FDA-approved vaccines. Now, get vaccinated. 

Shenanigans

Shenanigans: The procurement is right

Guess the winning bids on these county of San Diego contracts

By Dave Maass

How much for metal and wood barricades, lapel-mics, and commercial truck driver's license training? 

Shenanigans

Shenanigans: Secretary of defense mini-crossword

Which secretaries fit in the blanks?

By Dave Maass

Which secretary was the subject of the 2003 Oscar-winning documentary Fog of War

Shenanigans

Shenanigans: Gun game

Can you identify these firearms, which were all explicitly named in the 1994 assault-weapons ban?

By Dave Maass

Can you tell the difference between an Uzi and a Striker 12?

Shenanigans

Shenanigans: Ebenezer teasers

Bah humbug! Here's some trivia to bum you out on Christmas

By Dave Maass

How much sugar is in a standard-sized candy cane? Which toys are potentially dangerous? Happy holidays! 

Shenanigans

Shenanigans: Dwarf hunt

Can you find the 15 members of 'Thorin & Company' from The Hobbit: An Unexpected Journey?

By Dave Maass

Hint: there are 13 dwarves, one hobbit and one wizard.

Shenanigans

Shenanigans: Filner's furrow

Can you find your way through the new San Diego mayor's thoughts?

By Dave Maass

The new mayor's brain is a labyrinth! (But with less David Bowie and more focus on neighborhoods).  

Shenanigans

Shenanigans: The procurement is right

Guess the winning bids on these county of San Diego contracts

By Dave Maass

Flashlights, double-cotton-crotch underwear and pavement markings all won bids from San Diego County.

Sordid Tales

The asinine petition to bring back a dead TV character

Don’t read this if you’re not caught up with ‘The Walking Dead’

By Edwin Decker

Warning: This column is a spoiler for those who haven't seen Season 5 of The Walking Dead.

Sordid Tales

Misinformation continues to surround the McDonald’s hot-coffee case

How can so many people be wrong about something for so long?

By Edwin Decker

I heard it again. It was during that show The Talk, when one of the guests—some actor I’d never heard of—was talking about frivolous lawsuits and mentioned the famous 1994 McDonald’s hot-coffee case.

Sordid Tales

A sordid jackass defends the Irish exit

There are too many good reason to slip out into the night

By Edwin Decker

For those who don’t know, the Irish Exit—also known as The French Leave, The English Goodbye, The Irish Goodbye and ghosting—refers to a departure from a party, a bar or some other gathering without announcement. 

Sordid Tales

San Diego Super Credit Card Chargers

Rewriting the worst team fight song in the NFL

By Edwin Decker

Now that the Chargers have excised the tumor that was Coach Norv Turner and are back to kicking most excellent ass, it's time to address another pressing issue concerning this team. 

Sordid Tales

Clarifying the consent standard for sexual assault

Yes plus yes plus yes plus yes plus no means no

By Edwin Decker

On Sept 28, Gov. Jerry Brown passed a bill requiring colleges and universities to apply an "affirmative consent" standard in the investigations and tribunals of campus-related sexual assaults.

Sordid Tales

A letter from my younger self to my older self

Don’t be like Oprah Winfrey, Tyler Perry, Dwight Howard and Art Garfunkel

By Edwin Decker

Just Google "letter to my younger self" (LTMYS), and it'll return about a gazillion hits. Some are celebrity letters. Other letters are from regular Joes. There are tons of YouTube messages, magazine features and several books. 

Sordid Tales

Waiter Math and the demise of mandatory tipping

Servers needn’t gnash their teeth amid new rules for restaurants

By Edwin Decker

An Aug. 28 U-T San Diego story reports that the California Board of Equalization is updating the tax code to ensure that sales taxes will be collected on "mandatory tips."

Sordid Tales

The wrong way to role-play—choo choo!

Passive-Aggressive Co-worker? Seriously?

By Edwin Decker

Now, I'm not the role-playing type. The only role I have ever played in a romantic relationship is my signature "Honey I'm busy, can you make this quick" character that pretty much destroyed my marriage.

Sordid Tales

Making an appointment for my midlife-crisis-oscopy

The many indignities of getting your intestines inspected

By Edwin Decker

If you're 50 or older, the American Cancer Society advises you to make an appointment to have a camera shoved up your ass via 5-foot tube so that a team of physicians can thoroughly examine that private, secret place where everything you've ever eaten goes to die.

Sordid Tales

Ocean Beach would prefer not to be cornholed

Funky community’s residents don’t live in Pacific Beach for a reason

By Edwin Decker

The issue at hand is complicated and tedious, so let me summarize in a way that everyone, including me, can understand. Basically, Satan and his conglomerate minions want to cornhole the little people of Ocean Beach.

Spin Cycle

Clarification to 'Carl DeMaio will not go quietly'

We won’t have this curious man-child to kick around anymore, or will we?

By John R. Lamb

For San Diego, the Decade of Carl DeMaio ends not with a bang, but with some flailing and a whiny whimper. Should we have expected anything less? 

Spin Cycle

Magic Budget Fairy drops in for the holidays

A chance encounter at December Nights

By John R. Lamb

 It’s a cool Friday night among throngs of meandering strangers in Balboa Park, its iconic buildings awash in a rotating palette of vibrant colors.

Spin Cycle

Francine Busby preps for a fight

Is a challenger to San Diego County Democratic Party chair in the wings?

By John R. Lamb

During the last few weeks, rumblings of dissension have begun bubbling to the surface in the churning cauldron that is the San Diego County Democratic Party.

Spin Cycle

Carl DeMaio will not go quietly

We won’t have this curious man-child to kick around anymore, or will we?

By John R. Lamb

For San Diego, the Decade of Carl DeMaio ends not with a bang, but with some flailing and a whiny whimper. Should we have expected anything less?

Spin Cycle

Carl DeMaio: the Ebola of political wannabes?

Spooky choice for San Diego’s GOP electeds

By John R. Lamb

When it comes to local Republican elected officials, the bandwagon for 52nd District congressional candidate Carl DeMaio seems quite roomy.

Spin Cycle

Where Carl DeMaio goes, weirdness follows

Karma, lie detectors and the unlikelihood of happy endings

By John R. Lamb

If congressional candidate Carl DeMaio keeps throwing people under the bus, it’s conceivable that one day the former San Diego City Council member will be able to count all his friends on one hand.

Spin Cycle

Lessons from Belmont Park

Roller-coaster relationships on the San Diego City Council exposed

By John R. Lamb

Last week may have represented the dueling duo’s nadir in interpersonal relationships, when the City Council on Sept. 22 battled it out along party lines over a proposed 55-year lease extension for the operators of Belmont Park.

Spin Cycle

Minimum-wage battle, ‘Dragnet’-style

Sgt. Joe Tuesday and partner Gill Bannon respond to Councilmember Sherman’s frantic call

By John R. Lamb

This is the city. San Diego, California. I work here. I carry a notebook. My name’s Spin. The column you are about to read is true; one name has been changed to protect the not-so-innocent.

Spin Cycle

Activist attorney Cory Briggs is on a roll

Fresh off a victory in a fight over convention-center expansion, his sites are now on the Tourism Marketing District

By John R. Lamb

The attorney who kicked sand into the gears of the San Diego Convention Center expansion plans says he’s just getting started.

Spin Cycle

Will the minimum-wage fight devour Kevin Faulconer’s future?

And speaking of fights, who would win: Jason Roe or a great white shark?

By John R. Lamb

When the San Diego City Council on Monday voted to uphold its earlier decision to require earned sick days and boost the city’s minimum wage incrementally to $11.50 by 2017—thereby smushing the mayor’s veto—you could hear the sharpening of knives emanating from Faulconer’s political brain trust.

 
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