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Perry Vasquez: Collaborate Jul 31, 2015 The local artist, teacher and curator will discuss the importance of artistic collaboration at this CreativeMornings talk. 112 other events on Friday, July 31
 
Arts & Culture feature
From SuicideGirls and Walking Dead haunted houses to superhero art shows and Nerdist carnivals, there’s plenty to do without a pass.
All Things Tech
Legacy businesses, like MLB, can’t harness control forever
Seen Local
Real estate company carves out significant space for local art
Seen Local
Artist Carl Raymond Schmidt says it’s OK to play
The Beerdist
A rundown of beer events at this year's convention

 

 
 
Backwards & in High Heels

How to be an interrupter

A white person’s guide to activism

By Aaryn Belfer

Dead is final. And Sandra Bland is dead. The 28-year-old black activist was driving to her new job in Texas on July 10 when she was stopped by police for changing lanes without indicating.

Backwards & in High Heels

Joy mixed with pain

Equality and funerals are the stories of the day

By Aaryn Belfer

Like so many other commuters last Friday morning, I navigated my way toward work barely able to see the road through the rush of my tears.

Backwards & in High Heels

Opt out, tune in

School of life teaches more than standardized tests

By Aaryn Belfer

 L ast week was the first of two at my daughter’s school during which the new Smarter Balanced Assessments would be administered each day from 9 a.m. until 12:30 p.m. At the exact time most of

Backwards & in High Heels

About that drought data…

Working stiffs reduce, the rich get the rebates

By Aaryn Belfer

Depending on which of the plentiful news articles you're currently reading about the California drought, San Diegans have either been really great at conserving water or not so great at conserving water. 

Backwards & in High Heels

The renovation will not be on HGTV

A kitchen re-do can be emotionally exhausting

By Aaryn Belfer

It was sometime during the early- to mid-'80s when my mother took our kitchen down to the studs. I was between the ages of 12 and door-slamming angst, which, come to think of it, may or may not be all that temperamentally different than the me of today. 

Backwards & in High Heels

Bail setting is racially imbalanced

Baltimore kid goes to jail as an example to would-be rioters

By Aaryn Belfer

Allen Bullock had been sleeping in jail for more than a week, and not too many people seemed appropriately pissed off about it. In fact, most people I talk to about him just stand silently, blinking, blinking. 

Backwards & in High Heels

Resistance to mandated school tests grows

More than triple the number of kids opted out of federal exams

By Aaryn Belfer

I prepped my fourth-grader this past Sunday for her return to school following a month of unencumbered childhood, more widely known as spring break. 

Backwards & in High Heels

The fairy tale of officer friendly

Just walking while black is still perceived as a crime in San Diego

By Aaryn Belfer

Two days after the captured-on-video murder of unarmed black man Walter Scott by white South Carolina police officer Michael Slager, my friend's black teenaged son dared to walk through his Scripps Ranch neighborhood. The nerve.

Backwards & in High Heels

A smorgasbord of news topics

Punk pilots, Chargers chumps and slut-shaming Monica Lewinsky

By Aaryn Belfer

Being trapped in the land of So Many Topics to Choose From, I'm compelled to weigh in on as many as will fit on this page. Prepare for the smorgasbord I'm going to lay before you. 

Backwards & in High Heels

Smarter Balanced Assessments are around the corner

In favor of opting out of the test

By Aaryn Belfer

The only thing obstructing my view of the end of my daughter's fourth-grade year is the ugly last third of it. I say "ugly" because what comes with the final excruciating months is the amplified prep for, and implementation of—wait for it—standardized testing.

Because I Said So

Pride and publicity

Of profits, promotions, parades and pandering

By Tony Phillips

San Diego's 32nd Annual Lesbian Gay Bisexual Transgender (LGBT) Pride Celebration got underway last Saturday with a parade that passed in front of my house. Location, location, location.

Divided State of America

Trump is just playing the percentages

Billionaire candidate only needs a small fraction of voters

By Chad Peace

Everyone is talking about him. Republican voters support him. And that’s what he needs right now to be a Presidential contender.

Divided State of America

Will the Motor Voter Act drive participation?

Proponents hope easier voter registration will boost election numbers

By Chad Peace

Democracy functions best when the most people participate. And if you accept that standard, our democracy is not functioning well.

Divided State of America

Political parties block right to vote

New Jersey’s closed primaries favor parties over the people

By Chad Peace

The average voter turnout in New Jersey’s primary elections is just 8 percent, and it costs taxpayers $12 million to administer each election cycle.

Divided State of America

Like him or not, DeMaio faced false accusation

Sex harassment charge from 2014 proves false

By Chad Peace

Only a few weeks before Election Day, CNN—America’s most trusted purveyor of unverified information—broke a story revealing that a political aide to candidate Carl DeMaio had accused the openly gay Republican of sexual harassment.

Divided State of America

An unfair advantage in campaign financing

Political parties have special rights to give more money

By Chad Peace

One of the stranger San Diego political battles brewing for the 2016 season is a challenge to County Supervisor Dianne Jacob being mounted by fellow Republican Joel Anderson.

Divided State of America

Right to vote is under attack

You shouldn’t have to join a political party to participate in primaries

By Chad Peace

We do not get our right to vote because we are white, black, gay, straight, male, female, conservative, liberal, a member of a private organization or any other criteria other than what makes us American: citizenship.

Editor's Note

Wish you all were here

It’s a farewell column, not an acceptance speech

By David Rolland

It's Monday night, and I'm 503 miles north of the CityBeat office. I'm in my new home in a neighborhood known as Mansion Flats in downtown Sacramento.

Editor's Note

My tribute to Kelly Davis

She’s been my journalism partner for more than a dozen years

By David Rolland

As I announced two weeks ago, Kelly and I are both leaving CityBeat; Kelly’s last day was Tuesday. This is my tribute to her—my longtime partner in journalism, my closest friend and the little sister I never had.

Editor's Note

Long live CityBeat!

Kelly Davis and I are moving on

By David Rolland

If you’re not on Twitter, you might not have heard the news that my longtime associate editor, Kelly Davis, and I are both leaving CityBeat.

Editor's Note

Je ne suis pas Charlie

An existentialist stream of consciousness on the Paris massacre

By David Rolland

I am not Charlie. By that, I don’t mean to say that I don’t stand in solidarity, symbolically at least, with the folks at the French publication Charlie Hebdo who were murdered last week by Islamic radicals. I do stand with them, symbolically.

Editor's Note

Carl DeMaio and difficult decisions

Absolute certainty amid scandal allegations is elusive, so voters will have to go with their gut

By David Rolland

I knew enough about Filner that the accusations against him didn’t surprise me. I know enough about DeMaio that Bosnich’s claims don’t surprise me, either.

Editor's Note

Emma Watson, feminism and the fight

Being a feminist never seemed all that complicated to me

By David Rolland

Of all the important words spoken by actor Emma Watson in her speech on feminism to the United Nations on Sept. 20, the line that jumped out at me was this: “I decided that I was a feminist, and this seemed uncomplicated to me.”

Editor's Note

Dreaming of a new Cabrillo Bridge

Wouldn’t it be great to find a non-catastrophic way to close that span to cars?

By David Rolland

The bridge closure provided a great opportunity to test those theories and to study the full impact of the shutdown on the park, its institutions and the surrounding areas, and I’m eager to see what the city learned.

Editor's Note

SeaWorld: one guy’s take

I don’t really go for the caged-wildlife thing to begin with

By David Rolland

Richard Bloom, a Democrat who represents the Santa Monica area, wants to ban public entertainment involving killer whales, end the captive breeding of whales, bar companies from importing or exporting whales and move SeaWorld’s 10 whales into ocean pens. 

Editor's Note

An open letter to Bob Filner

How can you bear going on like this?

By David Rolland

You might learn to be more respectful of women, but the damage is done. You might survive a recall process, but only on technicalities. If a vote were held today on whether you should be mayor, you’d get killed.

Editor's Note

Anders Wright and Peter Holslin leaving CityBeat

Longtimers on the way out; three new guys coming in

By David Rolland

This issue marks the final one with Peter Holslin as music editor and Anders Wright as film editor. I know!

Editorial

Bonnie Dumanis’ attack on freedom

District attorney wants to jail people for rapping and posting on Facebook

By CityBeat Staff

San Diego County District Attorney Bonnie Dumanis is out of control. Her office filed charges against 15 San Diego men for conspiracy to commit various violent crimes even though there’s no evidence that they had anything to do with the offenses.

Editorial

On the Chargers, politicians need to remain calm

Stop right after saying the team should stay in San Diego

By CityBeat Staff

Two teams might be allowed to move to L.A.; three teams won’t. At least one of these contestants will have to go home a loser. No offense, but we’re hoping it’s the Chargers.

Editorial

Slow the wheel’s roll

Why does everyone suddenly want to turn San Diego into an amusement park?

By CityBeat Staff

What is it all of a sudden with all these proposals for amusement-park rides in downtown San Diego?

Editorial

Faulconer’s stadium push is already SAGging

Advisory group apparently can pay consultants to help strategize a Chargers fix

By CityBeat Staff

 It wasn’t long after San Diego Mayor Kevin Faulconer announced that he’d assembled a nine-person Citizens Stadium Advisory Group (SAG) to come up with a development and financing proposal fo

Editorial

Inequality widens in California since the recession

This land is their land

By CityBeat Staff

California has the fifth-largest gap in the country between the average incomes of the 1 percent and the 99 percent—here, the wealthiest folks make, on average, 35 times what the rest of us make.

Editorial

Todd Gloria and David Alvarez are the opposition party

And that’s good for all of us

By CityBeat Staff

It surely sounds like Todd Gloria’s running for mayor. And it looks like he’s got a running mate of sorts in David Alvarez. This is good to see, whether or not you’re likely to support Mayor Kevin Faulconer for a second term in 2016.

Editorial

San Diego politics-watch, 2015

Our eyes are on these guys

By CityBeat Staff

You’ll see when you read further that it must be gender-non-specific. The following list of people to watch in San Diego politics in 2015 is loaded with women—more than half of the powerful people here carry two X chromosomes.

Editorial

Turds & Blossoms for 2014

Who gets the poops and who gets the petals

By CityBeat Staff

San Diego County Democratic Party: The local Dems get 22,644 tiny, ballot-bubble-size poopies. That’s the combined number of votes that the Republicans got over and above what the Dems got in three crucial elections this year.

Editorial

When will the Chargers finally propose?

Still waiting for a concrete idea from the Spanos clan

By CityBeat Staff

Mark Fabiani, longtime special counsel and front man for San Diego Chargers owner Dean Spanos, last week announced that the Chargers will once again not take advantage of the football company’s annual contractual opportunity to flee town for a place inhabited by more appreciative people.

Editorial

The ballad of Sherri and Todd

Assessing the Republicans’ ouster of the San Diego City Council president

By CityBeat Staff

Two weeks ago, we published an editorial urging San Diego City Councilmember Sherri Lightner to "stand down" amid a Republican scheme to install her as council president and end the reign of Todd Gloria.

From the Editor

Seau’s silent treatment

Hall of Fame still won’t let Junior’s daughter speak

By Ron Donoho

It's maddening that San Diego's two all-time biggest sports personalities received different forms of posthumous silent treatment.

From the Editor

More poker faces with Chargers stadium game

We haven’t seen the river card, yet

By Ron Donoho

Poker analogies have been and continue to be appropriate in assessing the high-stakes game being played by the city of San Diego and the Chargers over new stadium siting and funding.

From the Editor

Turn and face the change

San Diego Pride is a time to reflect, celebrate

By Ron Donoho

This weekend is a well-deserved opportunity for the San Diego LGBT community to celebrate tangible progress in an evolution of attitude, most notably, the Supreme Court’s thunderbolt ruling.

From the Editor

May the enforcement be with you

Comic-Con needs to step up sexual harassment policy

By Ron Donoho

Comic-Con needs to get more proactive in its stance on deterring acts of sexual harassment.

From the Editor

How to beat Donald Trump

Make a pinata of the Mexico-slamming mogul

By Ron Donoho

An individual with nine billion dollars in self-proclaimed net worth could, theoretically, make the Greek government’s outstanding loan payment. That kind of capital, however, can’t buy you class, common sense or the ability to keep your own foot out of your mouth.

From the Editor

What’s the deal with Seinfeld bashing?

SDSU student get huge reaction from PC letter

By Ron Donoho

Earlier this month, here in 2015, the real-life comedian Jerry Seinfeld went on ESPN Radio and said: “I don’t play colleges, but I hear a lot of people tell me, ‘Don’t go near colleges. They’re so [politically correct].’ ”That rankled San Diego State University student Anthony Berteaux.

From the Editor

What Bernie brings to the table

Political maverick Bernie Sanders is good for the country

By Ron Donoho

If you don’t care for summer schlockbusters and are tired of sequels, there’s an indie biopic making the rounds that just might score with voters when it’s awards time in Iowa next year.

From the Editor

Yes to death with dignity

Brittany Maynard is sparking political action on right-to-die law

By Ron Donoho

From beyond the grave, one woman’s story is moving California, and the nation, in the direction of right-to-die legislation.

From the Editor

Housing first, stadium second

The Chargers shouldn’t be first in line for a subsidy

By Ron Donoho

Where will the San Diego Chargers call home? A public subsidy of, say, $600 million might convince our local NFL football team to stay in Mission Valley and play in a new billion-dollar-plus stadium (give or take about a hundred moving parts).

From the Editor

Congrats, class of 2015

Now go out and save the world

By Ron Donoho

We’re smack in the middle of the college graduation season. University of San Diego just held its ceremony. San Diego State University pushed droves of grads out of the nest earlier this month, and UC San Diego seniors get the ejector seat in mid-June.

Letters

Letters to the editor

Our readers tell us what they think

Through tears I thank Aaryn Belfer for her essay. [“A white person’s guide to activism,” July 22”]. On Sunday I posted this plea to my friends and family around the world: “If you are a white American I’m asking you...I’m begging you to help your fellow black and brown Americans.

Letters

Letters to the editor

Our readers tell us what they think

Wow, Kinsee Morlan, stunning cover feature on Kathleen Mitchell [“A painful passion,” July 1], her glass work, her trauma, her being. I am so glad you stayed with CityBeat. This latest will win an award.

Letters

Letters to the editor

Our readers tell us what they think

Here we go again, poor Aaryn Belfer, Backwards & In High Heels, lamenting in her column “Joy mixed with pain” [July 1] about the social injustices perpetrated by our country. 

Letters

Letters to the editor

Our readers tell us what they think

While I laud Chad Peace’s goal that elections serve the people rather than the political parties [Political parties block your fundamental right to vote, July 1], I disagree with his thesis and method.

Letters

Letters to the editor

Our readers tell us what they think

I think what is wrong with San Diego State University student Anthony Berteaux’s statement is that he made it a righteous demand, when he should have said it was his opinion [What’s the deal with Seinfeld bashing?” June 24].

Letters

Letters to the editor

Our readers tell us what they think

Republicans on offense. Democrats on defense. Eight years of being audacious to hope, and creeping incremental change. Democrats have been running away from Obama, and The Affordable Care Act.

Letters

Letters to the editor

Our readers tell us what they think

DEATH WITH DIGNITY I am grateful to the California Senators for passing SB 128, End of Life Option Act [“Yes to death with dignity,” June 10]. I have terminal melanoma. So far, it cost me two

Letters

Letters to the editor

Our readers tell us what they think

At the risk of sounding like a “get-off-my-lawn” kind of guy, I have a few questions for Ryan Bradford regarding his experiences at the recent Neil Diamond concert [“The night I crashed Neil Diamond,” June 3].

Letters

Letters to the editor

Our readers tell us what they think

Great article by Michael Gardiner [“Just the tip,” May 27]. One HUGE factor not discussed however, is minimum wage. In rural Colorado (when I lived there), there was no minimum wage for wait staff so my friends made something pitiful like $3 an hour.

Letters

Letters to the editor

Our readers tell us what they think

I loved Aaryn Belfer’s column [“Bail setting is racially imbalanced,” May 13], as well as her previous work.

Political Lunacy

Haven't we been here before?

In San Diego politics, the frame of the game stays the same

By Carl Luna

In San Diego politics, the frame of the game stays the same

Political Lunacy

San Diego song

City may have passed a pain-free budget, but it has a bigger hole in it than Henry’s bucket

By Carl Luna

City may have passed a pain-free budget, but it has a bigger hole in it than Henry’s bucket

Political Lunacy

In lieu of flowers

A eulogy for departed City Attorney Mike Aguirre

By Carl Luna

A eulogy for departed City Attorney Mike Aguirre

Political Lunacy

Black hole in the sun

Why would anyone want to be a member of the San Diego City Council?

By Carl Luna

Why would anyone want to be a member of the San Diego City Council?

Political Lunacy

On to the 19th century!

You can’t fight City Hall—but you can fight retro plans to build a new one

By Carl Luna

You can’t fight City Hall—but you can fight retro plans to build a new one

Political Lunacy

An odd year

Elections in odd-numbered council districts and an odd trio challenging an odd city attorney make for odd times

By Carl Luna

Elections in odd-numbered council districts and an odd trio challenging an odd city attorney make for odd times

Political Lunacy

Light the candles

Even small wars cost a lot to raise these days

By Carl Luna

Even small wars cost a lot to raise these days

Political Lunacy

Tijuana burns

Our neighbor's house is on fire--and no one seems to give a damn

By Carl Luna

Our neighbor's house is on fire--and no one seems to give a damn

Political Lunacy

It's really not so bad

From financial woes to flaming fires, plagues of problems bedeviled San Diego in 2007, but we go on

By Carl Luna

From financial woes to flaming fires, plagues of problems bedeviled San Diego in 2007, but we muddled on

Political Lunacy

The fall of Mike Aguirre

Can the city attorney survive the autumn of his discontent?

By Carl Luna

Can the city attorney survive the autumn of his discontent?

Presently Tense

I'm tense no more

Out with this old column, in with a new one

By D.A. Kolodenko

Having grown up in San Diego seeing so many creative, smart people move to Los Angeles, San Francisco, New York, Europe and other, less-deserty pastures, I always admired those who stayed, or relocated, here for their resolve to make it work in a town where picking up a newspaper is less popular than applying zinc oxide to the nasal region.

Presently Tense

How may I help you?

Providing a different kind of tech support

By D.A. Kolodenko

Punya and Abhijeet, both in their late 20s, told me they were the only two guys from hundreds in the company’s Bangalore office who’d been sent to San Diego for training. So, these were the voices on the phone! I had come face to face with the living, breathing targets of every joke ever told in the U.S. about trying to get a modem fixed.

Presently Tense

Cuckoo world

My admiration for a local antiques collector

By D.A. Kolodenko

Long before the Gaslamp Quarter became the gentrified playground of San Diego’s young 9-to-5ers, there was this giant antique mall down there, south of Market.

Presently Tense

Sleepless in San Diego

Where can a night owl go for a hoot

By D.A. Kolodenko

If New York is the city that never sleeps, San Diego is the city that has a glass of warm soymilk before tucking itself into bed at 8:30.Sure, you’ve got your weekend Pacific Beach bro-fest, your

Presently Tense

The politics of dancing

Shaking up the meaning of an American memorial

By D.A. Kolodenko

Five people were arrested on Saturday for dancing at the Jefferson Memorial in Washington, D.C.

Presently Tense

A view of the bridge

Balboa Park’s future in the grand scheme of things

By D.A. Kolodenko

I’m sure you’ve heard about Irwin Jacobs’ plan to invest in a park renovation that would remove cars from the Plaza De Panama in the heart of the park and divert traffic coming off of the Cabrillo Bridge toward other parking areas.

Presently Tense

Bird of sacrifice

Pelicans are large and in charge, but their future is murky

By D.A. Kolodenko

Living smack in front of the tide pools in O.B. for 11 years will make an amateur pelican expert out of you, and it occurs to me that this year, something looks different.

Presently Tense

Roe v. Wade on hold

Facing the erosion of abortion rights in America

By D.A. Kolodenko

It’s already happening across the country. The New York Times reported that since Republicans made gains in the mid-term elections, 29 states now have anti-choice governors and 15 have both anti-choice governors and legislatures.

Presently Tense

Nukikazes wanted

Japan’s crisis offers a glowing opportunity

By D.A. Kolodenko

One of the more interesting yet under-reported stories from the ongoing disaster in Japan is about how the Tokyo Electric Power Company has ramped up its effort to find workers willing to brave the dangerous conditions at the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear plant.

Presently Tense

Meltdown versus shutdown

Let’s stop sucking the nuclear boobs

By D.A. Kolodenko

Shut down San Onofre Nuclear Power Plant! If enough of us demand it, it will happen. Raise your voices! Send letters! Organize a demonstration! Walk like an Egyptian!

Shenanigans

Shenanigans: The search is over

Staff writer Dave Maass is leaving; can you find 22 of his favorite subjects?

By Dave Maass

Bill Horn, marijuana, Occupy SD, Zany-Zane and Gary Kreep were among our beloved staff writer's favorite topics. 

Shenanigans

Shenanigans: Black History mini-crossword

Fill in the blanks with prominent African-American figures

By Dave Maass

Who is the current Assembly member for District 79? Plus more questions involving prominent African-American San Diegans. 

Shenanigans

Shenanigans: Flu hunt

Can you find nine flu symptoms and the six FDA-approved vaccines?

By Dave Maass

A list of the six FDA-approved vaccines. Now, get vaccinated. 

Shenanigans

Shenanigans: The procurement is right

Guess the winning bids on these county of San Diego contracts

By Dave Maass

How much for metal and wood barricades, lapel-mics, and commercial truck driver's license training? 

Shenanigans

Shenanigans: Secretary of defense mini-crossword

Which secretaries fit in the blanks?

By Dave Maass

Which secretary was the subject of the 2003 Oscar-winning documentary Fog of War

Shenanigans

Shenanigans: Gun game

Can you identify these firearms, which were all explicitly named in the 1994 assault-weapons ban?

By Dave Maass

Can you tell the difference between an Uzi and a Striker 12?

Shenanigans

Shenanigans: Ebenezer teasers

Bah humbug! Here's some trivia to bum you out on Christmas

By Dave Maass

How much sugar is in a standard-sized candy cane? Which toys are potentially dangerous? Happy holidays! 

Shenanigans

Shenanigans: Dwarf hunt

Can you find the 15 members of 'Thorin & Company' from The Hobbit: An Unexpected Journey?

By Dave Maass

Hint: there are 13 dwarves, one hobbit and one wizard.

Shenanigans

Shenanigans: Filner's furrow

Can you find your way through the new San Diego mayor's thoughts?

By Dave Maass

The new mayor's brain is a labyrinth! (But with less David Bowie and more focus on neighborhoods).  

Shenanigans

Shenanigans: The procurement is right

Guess the winning bids on these county of San Diego contracts

By Dave Maass

Flashlights, double-cotton-crotch underwear and pavement markings all won bids from San Diego County.

Sordid Tales

Rihanna’s oversexed take on American history

Singer doesn’t know when to lay off the sex stuff

By Edwin Decker

I finally saw the video for the relatively new Rihanna song, “American Oxygen.” And while I rather like the haunting resonance of the music and its theme, the video itself has one glaring problem: Rihanna is in it. 

Sordid Tales

The Premium Liquor Experiment and Taste Test

Don’t order premium liquor when rotgut does just as well

By Edwin Decker

Most publications' drinks issue contains lots of hipster-crafty cocktail recipes with a variety of fancy liquor brands. I would like to pipe in at this time to say, "Don't. Don't. Don't believe the hype."

Sordid Tales

The trouble with smiting

God gave us the drought because he hates gays, duh

By Edwin Decker

Whatever the cataclysm, be it a tsunami, hurricane, pandemic or Kardashian family squabble, there's always more than a few lunatics who like to say the disaster is God's wrath against the LGBT community.

Sordid Tales

To asterisk or not to asterisk?

Devising a system to identify disparities in the sports record books

By Edwin Decker

Thanks to recent controversies surrounding Tom Brady and Alex Rodriguez, the age-old argument involving the asterisk has re-emerged.

Sordid Tales

Condoning and/or participating

A solution to the Religious Freedom Restoration Act problem

By Edwin Decker

It truly hurts my gonads to agree with the religious right about anything, but I take their side regarding the Indianapolis gay wedding cake denial debacle, and a spreading piece of legislation known as the Religious Freedom Restoration Act (RFRA).

Sordid Tales

How to survive a music festival

The real-world advice on dress, drugs, Vaseline and more

By Edwin Decker

Now that music-festival season is upon us, it’s time once again to be inundated with countless magazine and blog stories with advice on how best to survive and enjoy your festival experience. 

Sordid Tales

Treason! School pledge read in Arabic

I pledge allegiance to jihad on the United States of America

By Edwin Decker

I'm sure you've heard the one about the New York high school that committed "treason" by permitting a student to recite the Pledge of Allegiance over the school's PA—in Arabic.

Sordid Tales

Putting women on money is so money

Why Harriet Tubman’s more deserving of the 20-spot than Andrew Jackson

By Edwin Decker

Perhaps you've heard of the group Women on 20s, which is seeking to replace Andrew Jackson on the $20 bill with a notable American female.

Sordid Tales

The House that Influenza Built

Why I will no longer say, ‘God bless you’

By Edwin Decker

In other words, I will never again utter the words "God bless you" after somebody sneezes. And I don't care who it is: my mother, my boss, my parole officer.

Sordid Tales

The changing definition of the word ‘literally’

Amnesty for ignorance is what it is

By Edwin Decker

Apologies for addressing this issue belatedly, but it only recently became known to me. Apparently, a little more than a year ago—quite silently and with minimal brouhaha—Webster's Dictionary (an

Spin Cycle

The nomination of Bob Ottilie

Ethics Commission spat goes public

By John R. Lamb

He is a mayor who is all smiles publicly. But the latest City Hall fracas facing Kevin Faulconer likely has evoked a private frowny face or two.

Spin Cycle

If Mayor Faulconer were Superman…

Our metropolis as seen by a political man of steel

By John R. Lamb

Hey everybody! How’s that for an entrance? Beats the leotard off last year’s zip-line arrival, eh? Yeah, that harness left a few marks, if you know what I mean. Plus I had to share the spotlight with then-City Council President Todd Gloria.

Spin Cycle

Activist lawyer offers Plan B for stadium, center expansion

Cory Briggs: Raise TOT, put two initiatives on primary ballot

By John R. Lamb

It's become clear that local political leaders have hit a wall in their dealings with the San Diego Chargers on a new stadium. 

Spin Cycle

Break out the pea shooters!

Amid stadium talks, mayoral political ops suit up

By John R. Lamb

On Monday, as this city hurtles toward another election cycle in 2016, Mayor Kevin Faulconer laid out a game plan that would have city voters weigh in on a still-to-be-negotiated stadium plan for the San Diego Chargers by Dec. 15 of this year.

Spin Cycle

'It’s go time' for Mayor Faulconer

Decision time arriving on Chargers stadium

By John R. Lamb

A local sports-radio commentator recently asked—rhetorically—when Mayor Kevin Faulconer planned to put on his “big-boy pants” in the fight to keep the San Diego Chargers from leaving town.

Spin Cycle

Set your politicians on 'Stun!'

Convention Center expansion woes prompt privatization talk

By John R. Lamb

Public officials who claim to be “shocked” at anything these days should come equipped with a large grain of salt. The most recent example? Last week’s City Council review of next year’s proposed budget for the San Diego Convention Center Corp. had everything.

Spin Cycle

Political May daze

A nightmare scenario breweth for Faulconer

By John R. Lamb

Establishing shot: A picture-postcard day in the cultural heart of the city, Balboa Park. (Take that, Rob Quigley!) The new “living room,” to be precise, in the ever-evolving Plaza de Panama.

Spin Cycle

No guts, no Gloria

You can almost hear the helium hissing out of the local Democratic Party’s 2016 balloon

By John R. Lamb

When termed-out San Diego Councilmember Todd Gloria announced his decision last week to seek the seat of outgoing state Assemblymember Toni Atkins, rather than wage battle to be San Diego’s mayor, you could almost hear the helium hissing out of the local Democratic Party’s 2016 balloon.

Spin Cycle

Teeth are bared in Chargers fight

Stadium foes are smiling, snarling

By John R. Lamb

In every political drama, there comes the shark-jumping moment. In the escalating Charger’s stadium war of words, the media battleship U-T San Diego may have produced it last weekend with an article that posed the question: “Did Mark Fabiani jinx the Chargers-Raiders stadium plan for Carson?” 

Spin Cycle

Kevin Faulconer is winging it

Mayor’s PR machine is no match for the Chargers

By John R. Lamb

On the keep-the-Chargers-from-bolting front, it’s gotten so bad for Mayor Kevin Faulconer that even Republican-friendly KUSI is stirring it up.

 
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