My Friends

Arrow Up

Arrow Up
Arrow Down
,
  • Wed
    23
  • Thu
    24
  • Fri
    25
  • Sat
    26
  • Sun
    27
  • Mon
    28
  • Tue
    29
Barrio Art Crawl Jul 26, 2014 A free self guided tour consisting of murals, open studios, galleries, and local businesses throughout the Barrio Logan Arts District. Come enjoy art, live music, food, and vendors at places like La Bodega Gallery & Studios, Roots Factory, Union Barrio Logan, Glashaus, and more. 91 other events on Saturday, July 26
 
Arts & Culture feature
New business is illuminating the imagery found in science
Theater
Joint production by La Jolla Playhouse and San Diego Rep leads our rundown of local plays
Spin Cycle
Did Carl DeMaio’s partner overstep his authority by ousting business-association chief?
News
San Diego planning director’s uphill battle to create walkable communities
Editorial
Mayor’s actions so far betray his pitch, but there’s still hope

 

 
Log in to use your Facebook account with
San Diego CityBeat

Login With Facebook Account

Recent Activity on San Diego CityBeat
 
Home / Articles / Music / The Buzz Files /  Moombahton madness
. . . .
Wednesday, Sep 28, 2011

Moombahton madness

Emerging electronic dance-music genre takes hold at U-31

By Peter Holslin

In San Diego, moombahton might just be the new dubstep.

At the Sept. 21 kickoff of Bajaton, a new moombahton night at U-31, the bar was only about half full, but something about the music—perhaps it was the combination of manic synths and massive, syncopated bass drums—was driving people crazy. Guys were jerking around wildly, inventing ridiculous dance moves on the spot. One girl kept dropping to the floor, bumping and grinding, lost in raunchy reverie.

I’ve seen people get crazy at dubstep nights, too. Indeed, both genres are often loud, heavy and borderline obnoxious—like all the best party music. But while the trendy, chainsaw-ripping dubstep that DJs have been spinning lately has about as much grace as an NFL linebacker, even the hardest, heaviest, most headache-inducing moombahton tracks have soul. The Latin-flavored beats seduce you, making you move even if you don’t want to.

Also unlike dubstep, moombahton is a young genre. It first emerged in late 2009 when a DJ named Dave Nada thought to slow down an Afrojack remix of DJ Silvio Ecomo’s Dutch house track “Moombah” to a sensuous 108 beats per minute. The stuff I heard at U-31 wasn’t all that different from Nada’s original creation, but DJs have already coined subgenres like “moombahcore” (harder, heavier) and “moombahsoul” (softer, sexier), and there’s no saying what direction moombahton will go next.




 
 
 
 
 
 
Close
Close
Close