My Friends

Arrow Up

Arrow Up
Arrow Down
,
  • Wed
    26
  • Thu
    27
  • Fri
    28
  • Sat
    29
  • Sun
    30
  • Mon
    1
  • Tue
    2
Turkey Calling Show Nov 26, 2014 This show is presented like an old-time live radio broadcast with performances by The Teeny-Tiny Pit Orchestra and hosted by sound effects expert Scott Paulson.  45 other events on Wednesday, November 26
 
Film
New indie film starring Shailene Woodley tops our coverage of movies screening around town
Film
New Christopher Nolan epic leads our rundown of movies screening around town
Theater
First production by the latest troupe to launch in San Diego leads our rundown of local plays
Editorial
Bring it with you on Nov. 4

 

 
Log in to use your Facebook account with
San Diego CityBeat

Login With Facebook Account

Recent Activity on San Diego CityBeat
 
Home / Articles / Arts / Seen Local /  Alexander Jarman
. . . .
Wednesday, Dec 29, 2010

Alexander Jarman

The guy behind the collage on the front page of this week’s CityBeat

By Kinsee Morlan
Last week, Alexander Jarman made it into CityBeat’s pages for his contribution to the 2010 local-art landscape. He’s the public programs manager at the San Diego Museum of Art and the man behind the exciting Summer Salon Series that kicked off this year.

This week, we’re featuring one of Jarman’s untitled collages on our cover and focusing on his career as an artist whose work takes many different shapes and forms.

“I’m just now starting to show and get everything going,” says Jarman, opening the door to his small studio Downtown space at the Broker’s Building. “This is the space where the 2-D stuff mainly goes on.”

Tiny scraps of paper are scattered across the floor. He has a bigger drawing of shoes and upward pointing arrows on one wall, and his newest work—the collages—are framed and spread around the room. There’s a roll of cloth tucked away in the corner.

The collages are Jarman’s current obsession. And like the big drawing on his wall, most of the new pieces include images of shoes, shoelaces or ribbons. When I ask him to tell me the story behind the work, he takes a deep breath and launches into an explanation that’s at times clear (he’s extremely knowledgeable about art history) and at other times confusing (he’s an experimental, conceptual artist at heart).

In short, Jarman says, he’s commenting on the idea that people can “pull themselves up by their bootstrap”—the belief that if a person works hard enough, she or he can overcome poverty and other socioeconomic situations that others claim are unjust or unfair. He’s raising the idea, but he’s not telling you exactly what he thinks.

“I really want to approach making artwork as a sociologist and an anthropologist,” he says, citing the influence of his mother, who works at a nonprofit charity. “I think I am trying to talk about issues, problems and things that exist, but I refrain as much as possible about making a direct comment on them.”

Jarman uses that basic approach in most of his work, which includes installations and performance pieces, too. Earlier this year, he built an installation using cardboard boxes and blankets that became a visual representation of the various poverty levels across the U.S.

Unrolling the cloth in the corner of the room, Jarman explains that his next installation / performance piece will be using found cloth, washed then sewn together to create a giant blanket that he plans to unroll across an entire city block.

“We’ll invite the community to come together and talk and eat,” he says. “It’ll be one big picnic blanket.”




 
 
 
 
 
 
Close
Close
Close