My Friends

Arrow Up

Arrow Up
Arrow Down
,
  • Mon
    24
  • Tue
    25
  • Wed
    26
  • Thu
    27
  • Fri
    28
  • Sat
    29
  • Sun
    30
Alvy Ray Smith: From Pixels to Pixar Nov 24, 2014 The cofounder of Pixar and Altamira gives patrons a quick tour through computer graphics with amusing stories, vintage pictures and videos, and much more. 49 other events on Monday, November 24
 
The Floating Library
A work of historical fiction with a speculative twist
Backwards & in High Heels
Let’s move this time machine to 2014, shall we?
Film
New indie film starring Shailene Woodley tops our coverage of movies screening around town
Film
New Christopher Nolan epic leads our rundown of movies screening around town
Theater
First production by the latest troupe to launch in San Diego leads our rundown of local plays

 

 
Log in to use your Facebook account with
San Diego CityBeat

Login With Facebook Account

Recent Activity on San Diego CityBeat
 
. . . .
Tuesday, Jun 24, 2014

The Midnight Pine haunt and entrance on ‘Buried’

Group’s new album sounds simultaneously classic and modern

By Jeff Terich

I'm always a little wary of musicians who try too hard to innovate or put a modern spin on folk, Americana and country music. These are sounds and styles that are built more on storytelling and emotions than aesthetics, anyhow, so if you don't have something interesting to say in the first place, it's likely to be a hollow shell of a sound no matter how you dress it up. 

That hasn't stopped some from trying: David Gray dressed up folk with trip-hop beats; Mumford & Sons got seemingly endless mileage out of just one busker-stomp rhythm; and a wide range of artists in the last decade put the "freak" back in folk, to varying degrees of success.

Trying to reinvent folk music has never been the goal of The Midnight Pine, at least as far as I know. And yet there's a freshness to their music that eludes some of the slicker, more stylized string pluckers of late. Much of this can be credited to the vocal style of leader Shelbi Bennett, who wavers between sounding contemporary and being broadcast from a haunted Victrola, circa 1955. Her voice is a bit bluesier and deeper than those of like-minded singer / songwriters like Jolie Holland and Neko Case, but it's a uniquely sublime instrument all the same. Just listen to her overdubbed vocal harmonies on the a cappella standout "Lavish in Bloom" from new album Buried; it's about as perfect as a 56-second song gets.

On Buried, the group walks the line between modern and vintage with ease, while appearing to pay little mind to either. Theirs is an atmospheric, almost gothic style of folk that can be chilling, like on the vibraphone-accented "Hey There," or gently earthy, as on "Edge of Town." Every song is gorgeously arranged, ranging from noisy and ominous ("Mother of Amends") to drunken torch-song burlesque ("Tears"). 

From a distance, it might not seem as if The Midnight Pine have done anything particularly radical on Buried. And that's for the best; there's no need to stand in the way of songs this good. 

Email jefft@sdcitybeat.com or follow him at @1000TimesJeff




 
 
 
 
 
 
Close
Close
Close