My Friends

Arrow Up

Arrow Up
Arrow Down
,
  • Fri
    22
  • Sat
    23
  • Sun
    24
  • Mon
    25
  • Tue
    26
  • Wed
    27
  • Thu
    28
OVERFLOW Aug 22, 2014 A selection of new works by Scott Polach which draws on the history of pluviculture, or, attempts to induce rain artificially. Opening includes a collaborative performance piece from Keenan Hartsten entitled, "Very cool, and refreshing?". 85 other events on Friday, August 22
 
News
How one case study could potentially transform City Heights
News
Former customs agent got more than seven years for smuggling drugs and people into the U.S., but mysterious events are raising questions about the government’s prosecution
Well, That Was Awkward
Spooky hell, urine baptisms and other memories exorcised by the Broadway play
Film
Joe Swanberg’s new independent film starring Anna Kendrick leads our rundown of movies screening around town
Editorial
Formal complaint against the Probation Department shows how far local juvenile-detention practices are out of the mainstream

 

 
Log in to use your Facebook account with
San Diego CityBeat

Login With Facebook Account

Recent Activity on San Diego CityBeat
 
Home / Articles / Arts / Seen Local /  Yarns & Noble stretches string art
. . . .
Tuesday, Jun 10, 2014

Yarns & Noble stretches string art

Artist Geofrey Redd has taken the old genre to new heights

By Kinsee Morlan
yarnsandnoble3 Geofrey Redd, aka Yarns & Noble
- Photo by Matt Lingo

Geofrey Redd remembers making string art as a kid in geometry class. He hammered a few nails into a wooden board and created basic shapes by stringing yarn through the grid of nails.

About two years ago, Redd thought about trying to put a more modern and adult spin on string art, a genre that was embraced in the '60s and '70s but has been largely dormant since. He started working on his projects secretly at first, in part because he thought people would say it was silly.

"But I just kept going and going and going until I finally started noticing myself peaking," Redd says. "And so I started challenging myself with bigger pictures, then more complex pieces, and this is where I'm at now."

Redd, who goes by Yarns & Noble when his artwork is involved, is sitting under his large, nicely framed string-art piece depicting a green snake eying a bluebird flying overhead. He has several large works hanging at BlueFoot Bar & Lounge (3404 30th St., North Park) through the end of the month.

The detail and complexity that Redd's able to achieve with wood, yarn and nails is impressive. Part of his secret is the number of nails used in every creation: There are about 45 nails in just one small leaf in Redd's snake piece, for example, and about 25 leaves total—that's more than 1,000 nails used just in the background of one composition.

Redd is coy when asked for more details about his process. Like every artist working in a relatively obscure medium, he's nervous about being ripped off. Even if his technique is eventually copied, though, his lowbrow style and weird sense of humor won't be easy to replicate.

"I like putting sharp teeth on things that don't have teeth because I think it's funny-looking," he laughs, pointing to one of his mischievous-looking, snaggle-toothed yarn birds.

Photo by Matt Lingo

 


Write to editor@sdcitybeat.com and follow Kinsee on Facebook or Twitter 




 
 
 
 
 
 
Close
Close
Close