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Lester Bangs Memorial Reading Oct 21, 2014 Grossmont faculty and alumni writers, along with special guests, read their original works of poetry, fiction and creative nonfiction in tribute to “America’s Greatest Rock Critic.” In Room 220 of Building 26. 54 other events on Tuesday, October 21
 
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Home / Articles / Music / A Trolley Show /  Lost in Los Angeles: A Trolley Show
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Wednesday, May 14, 2014

Lost in Los Angeles: A Trolley Show

Band performs 'Waiting For Your Car' on the MTS

By Ryan Bradford

As San Diegans, it’s our duty to make fun of Los Angeles at every opportunity, if only to temper our own inferiority complexes: They have the traffic, their beaches are gross and it’s the place where every awful fashion and pop-culture stereotype goes to become normalized. But anyone who’s familiar with the films of David Lynch, classic L.A. pulp-noir novels or modern hardcore music appreciates the darkness and weirdness that city can produce, and the band Lost in Los Angeles seems to wear that weirdness on its sleeve.   

In this episode of A Trolley Show, the band performs “Waiting For Your Car,” which, in truth, is lyrically more forlorn than weird. However, the haunting keyboard and sparse drum machine give the song an eerie undertone, and as the song progresses, the subject of its perpetual absence becomes more ghostly. It’s an appropriate song from a sunny city built on darkness.




 
 
 
 
 
 
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