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Norm Macdonald Sep 18, 2014 The star of Norm, Dirty Work and pretty much the greatest host of SNL's "Weekend Update" ever gets back to his stand-up roots. 64 other events on Thursday, September 18
 
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Tuesday, Apr 08, 2014

Kill Holiday gets back together

Both lineups of the band will play Soda Bar in May

By Jeff Terich
Kill Holiday Kill Holiday, with Steven Andrew Miller second from left.

Kill Holiday are getting back together. More specifically, both lineups of the band—which formed in San Diego in 1994 and broke up in 2000—are getting back together for one double-reunion show at Soda Bar on May 31.

Steven Andrew Miller, the frontman and only member who's in both lineups, says the band isn't commemorating any particular anniversary; the idea of a reunion has simply been circulating among the members for a long time.

"It's pretty random, to be honest," he says. "Basically, everyone who had ever been in the band has been trying to organize a reunion."

In their first incarnation, Kill Holiday played a louder and more intense style of post-hardcore, as heard on their Monitor Dependency EP. But a few years later, Miller reconvened with new musicians and a new sound, inspired by the likes of Ride and The Smiths, on 1999's Somewhere Between the Wrong is Right. The only way to make a reunion show work, he says, is to split it into two different sets, so that it does justice to both versions. Though, Miller does point out one complication of that approach.

"The workload all falls on me, because I have to practice with both bands," he says.

In recent years, thanks to rampant nostalgia and increasingly lucrative opportunities to play big festivals, reunions have become a fairly common occurrence among punk and indie-rock bands from the 1990s. Miller even says the band's been approached by booking agencies with offers to play tours. But that doesn't seem to interest him. Kill Holiday is coming back for one night in May, and, for Miller, that's enough.

"Some bands get together and start writing new songs," he says. "I don't want to do that. I just want to play these songs for fun. 

"It's just kind of like a big party, you know?" 



Email jefft@sdcitybeat.com or follow him at @1000TimesJeff




 
 
 
 
 
 
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