My Friends

Arrow Up

Arrow Up
Arrow Down
,
  • Sun
    23
  • Mon
    24
  • Tue
    25
  • Wed
    26
  • Thu
    27
  • Fri
    28
  • Sat
    29
Mother Goose Parade Nov 23, 2014 The largest parade in San Diego County featuring more than 100 colorful and exciting parade entries, motorized floats, marching bands and drill units, and, of course, Santa Claus. 61 other events on Sunday, November 23
 
The Floating Library
A work of historical fiction with a speculative twist
Backwards & in High Heels
Let’s move this time machine to 2014, shall we?
Film
New indie film starring Shailene Woodley tops our coverage of movies screening around town
Film
New Christopher Nolan epic leads our rundown of movies screening around town
Theater
First production by the latest troupe to launch in San Diego leads our rundown of local plays

 

 
Log in to use your Facebook account with
San Diego CityBeat

Login With Facebook Account

Recent Activity on San Diego CityBeat
 
Home / Articles / Arts / Seen Local /  Ice Gallery guys prepare to open Bread & Salt
. . . .
Wednesday, Jan 30, 2013

Ice Gallery guys prepare to open Bread & Salt

Four installations will set the tone for future arts building in Barrio Logan

By David Rolland
seen1 Lee Lavy works on his installation.
- Photo by David Rolland

When architect James Brown brought Michael James Armstrong, Thomas DeMello, Joseph Huppert and Lee Lavy into the sprawling, cavernous Weber bread factory building in Barrio Logan and told them to pick spots for an art show, they must have felt like kittens in yarn heaven. The four artists, who comprised the former Ice Gallery in North Park, will eventually occupy a small corner of the building, but they’re spreading out for their first show, which will open with a reception from 6 to 9 p.m. Friday, Feb. 8.

“That’s the dream,” Armstrong says. “You get to a point, someday, to where people just offer you opportunities like that. They offer you a space and say, ‘Do whatever you want.’” The building itself (1955 Julian Ave.) will be known as Bread & Salt. Renovated by Brown’s firm, Public, the project will also include gallery and archive space for the San Diego Museum of Art, artists’ live-work spaces and other uses.

Huppert, DeMello, Lavy and Armstrong were all there last Saturday—Lavy and Huppert making early progress on their installations, DeMello and Armstrong leaving for a run to get supplies.

Armstrong, who’ll create tunnels using doorways, windows and fabric in a small group of rooms, playing with light and color, tells CityBeat that there’s no theme for the show, no relationships between the four installations. The artists toured the building, found their locations and let the ideas for how to transform the spaces come to them. No deep concepts are at play; it’s simply about aesthetics.

Lavy is the only one of the four using an upstairs space. After choosing the room, he saw an attic, where old machine parts, hoses and all manner of mechanical flotsam and jetsam were stored. For part of his installation, Lavy will replicate a wall where gears hung on racks.

“The attic was super-mysterious. This wall was all laid out with writing, and it was all very systematic, orderly,” Lavy says. “I mean, even all these parts,” he adds as he places various circular pieces on a taped off portion of the floor, “were all kind of in their proper places. … I really appreciated the way that it was set up, and I thought it was pretty beautiful.”

At the reception, there will be no signs guiding attendees along their way. Parts of the structure that aren’t in use will be blocked off; folks will find their way and view the art however they wish.

“I don’t like telling people how to view shit,” Armstrong says. “You just wander around. You’ll find it.” 


What do you think? Write to editor@sdcitybeat.com. Link up with editor David Rolland on Facebook or Twitter.

 



 
 
 
 
 
 
Close
Close
Close