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Soweto Gospel Choir Apr 16, 2014 Singing in English as well as a number of South African languages, the two-time Grammy Award-winning choir fuses traditional African gospel music—complete with occasional clicks and bird songs—with Western songs of celebration. 55 other events on Wednesday, April 16
 
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Wednesday, Nov 14, 2012

Michael Trigilio rocks out to Taylor Swift

Sound artist records an extra-special cover of No. 1 hit—plus, more music news

By Peter Holslin
smokin1 Michael Trigilio
- Photo by Mark Woodworth

Sound artist Michael Trigilio is perhaps best known for his experiments with multimedia and modular synthesizers. But last Saturday, he recorded something a little less abstract: a cover of Taylor Swift’s No. 1 hit, “We Are Never Ever Getting Back Together.”

Trigilio’s 92-second take isn’t any old cover of the popular breakup tune, though: It’s a death-metal jam with crunchy guitars, computerized blastbeats and Trigilio’s down-tuned, Cookie Monster-style growls.

“I recorded it in about three hours,” Trigilio says. “It took about, I don’t know, six minutes to learn that dumb song.”

Trigilio, a faculty member in the Visual Arts Department at UCSD, says he’s always “kind of hated” Swift’s music, but he finds this tune irresistibly catchy. He also appreciates its parallels with punk and metal.

“It’s such an angry song,” he says, “and also really adolescent.”

In 2008, Trigilio recorded death-metal versions of some David Bowie songs for a film he made, Breaking Glass: My David Bowie Movie. It’s unclear what’ll happen with his Swift cover, though, which you can listen to at soundcloud.com/starvelab.

“I’m not planning on anything,” he says. “I just did it to get it out of my system.”


Guitarist Sean Martin splits his time between several bands and freelance gigs. Last week, he played with The Midnight Pine at Soda Bar. When he got to the venue, he noticed something strange: The place looked completely different from how he’d remembered it. “It kinda scared me a little bit,” he says. Then, it dawned on him: He wasn’t at Soda Bar. He was at Eleven, a couple blocks up the street. Playing it cool, Martin packed up his gear (luckily just an acoustic guitar, effects board, and folding chair), told the doorman he’d be right back and headed to the right venue.

Hip-hoppers Parker & The Numberman are about to release a new album, SM57, featuring beats by local producer Room E. The album comes out on Nov. 26; check out a couple tracks at soundcloud.com/room-e.

Email peterh@sdcitybeat.com or follow him on Twitter at @peterholslin.




 
 
 
 
 
 
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