My Friends

Arrow Up

Arrow Up
Arrow Down
,
  • Tue
    29
  • Wed
    30
  • Thu
    31
  • Fri
    1
  • Sat
    2
  • Sun
    3
  • Mon
    4
Ferris Bueller’s Day Off Jul 29, 2014 Who needs school when you can spend your time dancing in downtown parades, driving fast cars and dining at posh restaurants? 64 other events on Tuesday, July 29
 
News
San Diego planning director’s uphill battle to create walkable communities
Film
Documentary about the famous film critic leads our rundown of movies screening around town
Editorial
Kevin Faulconer should follow Dallas County Judge Clay Jenkins’ lead
Seen Local
Painter spends plenty of time curating and exhibiting interesting work online
Arts & Culture feature
A look at the late architect's lasting impacts as his murderer faces 15 years to life

 

 
Log in to use your Facebook account with
San Diego CityBeat

Login With Facebook Account

Recent Activity on San Diego CityBeat
 
Home / Articles / Arts / Seen Local /  Kelsey Brookes gets trippy
. . . .
Wednesday, Oct 31, 2012

Kelsey Brookes gets trippy

Scientist-turned-artist will take you to a happy place with ‘Serotonin; Happiness and Spiritual States’

By Amy T. Granite
seen2 “Serotonin” by Kelsey Brookes
- Courtesy: Kelsey Brookes / Quint Contemporary Art

Kelsey Brookes is putting the finishing, trippy touches on paintings for Serotonin; Happiness and Spiritual States, his second solo show in San Diego that opens from 6 to 8 p.m. Saturday, Nov. 10, at Quint Contemporary Art in La Jolla (7547 Girard Ave.). Brookes, who traded in his lab coat for a paint-stained T-shirt, uses his scientific background and mind-expanding drug experiences to paint the molecular world as if Hunter S. Thompson were looking at it through an electron microscope.

Brookes has taken the structural framework of LSD, mescaline and DMT molecules and made large-scale, psychedelic representations of what they’d look like if, say, you dropped a tab, or several. The effect is a tidal wave of colors that floods your eyeballs with a swirling interplay of patterns that seem to move on the canvas without the help of drugs. Several of the works tower over Brookes’ head, and there are smaller pieces, too, that exhibit his precision and painstaking-detail style. From the center of the canvas, Brookes’ patterns bloom outward in a maze of pulsating colors, which he had help coloring in, he says.

Though he doesn’t dabble with hallucinogens anymore, Brookes says he’s able to get to a similar place through meditation. Practice makes perfect, or, at least, something amazing to look at.


Amy blogs at saysgranite.com and you can follow her on Twitter @saysgranite.




 
 
 
 
 
 
Close
Close
Close