My Friends

Arrow Up

Arrow Up
Arrow Down
,
  • Thu
    24
  • Fri
    25
  • Sat
    26
  • Sun
    27
  • Mon
    28
  • Tue
    29
  • Wed
    30
Nite Owls: The Darkroom Apr 24, 2014 A fun music and art mixer for 21to 40-somethings. This one includes a discussion with photographer Omar Lopez, a DJ playing old jazz records, collaborative art projects and darkroom photography activities. 59 other events on Thursday, April 24
 
Canvassed | Art & culture
A tale of near-death, bloody steaks and unprecedented opulence
News
Why the city can’t maintain enough emergency trucks
News
Meet ‘Jackie,’ one of the many faces of sex-trafficking
Film
Documentary about ill-fated project leads our rundown of movies screening around town
Editorial
Ten bucks an hour just ain’t enough

 

 
Log in to use your Facebook account with
San Diego CityBeat

Login With Facebook Account

Recent Activity on San Diego CityBeat
 
Home / Articles / Eats / Cocktail Tales /  JSix's fresh blends
. . . .
Monday, Sep 03, 2012

JSix's fresh blends

Lauren Lathrop puts a creative, culinary twist on the classics

By Kelly Davis
cocktails Spiced cherries

Lauren Lathrop’s not afraid to give away her secrets, like her recipe for the spiced cherries that garnish the Empire State, her take on a Manhattan. Made with vanilla-infused Bulleit Rye Whiskey and Noilly Pratt white vermouth, the drink represents the classics-with-a-twist theme that Lathrop used to put together JSix Restaurant’s cocktail menu.page2image16072page2image15800page2image15528

“They’re a little pungent because they’re pickled,” Lathrop says about the cherries. Indeed, they’re a pretty awesome balance of flavors—tart and subtly sweet with hints of the red wine and spices in which they’d been soaked.

Lathrop’s been at JSix for six years, starting out as a server and working her way up to management. During that time, she attended culinary school, where she focused on baking. Though she’s one test away from her sommelier’s certification, cocktails giveher a chance to put her training into practice.

“I like things that are from a more culinary perspective,” she says, “things that are made in-house, made from scratch.” Shetries to incorporate something from JSix’s rooftop garden in each drink, either as a garnish or to flavor a syrup ora cordial, like the fennel syrup she uses in the Fennel Collins (Plymouth gin, fresh Meyer lem-on, fennel syrup and soda) and the lime cordial for the Raymond Chandler gimlet.

Lathrop’s culinary training has made her mindful of the interplay of flavors. When I told her I like bourbon and St. Germain, she whipped up a cocktail on the fly with the vanilla-infused Bulleit, St. Germain and bitters, added a touch of Port with an eye dropper and garnished it with a mint leaf. The Port added depth (and gave it a lovely color). To the Chai Wallah—chai-infused rum, fresh orange and apple juice—she adds a touch of African red tea and garnishes it with a sprig of thyme and an orange slice.

“American palates for a long time have been very one-dimensional,” she says. “They want sweet, maybe a little sour. They want spicy, but they forget about the flavors like bitter or floral. I think that’s something that’s coming back—the appreciation of flavors that are outside the norm.” 


Email kellyd@sdcitybeat.com or follow her on Twitter at @citybeatkelly.




 
 
 
 
 
 
Close
Close
Close