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1492: Conquest of Paradise Jul 28, 2014 Gérard Depardieu plays Christopher Columbus in Ridley Scott’s big-budget telling of the “discovery” of the Americas. This film is presented as part of Film in the Garden, the Museum's Monday night sundown film series in the May S. Marcy Sculpture Garden. 65 other events on Monday, July 28
 
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Home / Articles / Music / Music feature /  Just can’t get enough
. . . .
Wednesday, Aug 22, 2012

Just can’t get enough

Top 10 overused rock-critic words or clichés

By Troy Johnson
music-sb

1. Indie: Used so often it became meaningless, like the word “friend.”

2. Garagey: In the mid-2000s, CityBeat’s music section read like a maladjusted Auto Trader.

3. Gravelly: Used when a singer’s voice sounded like he or she drank whiskey and smoked cigarettes until giving birth to their liver.

4. Straight outta [INSERT UNDESIRABLE TOWN]: NWA’s righteous battle cry for Compton was co-opted by a bunch of Anglos who thought it was cute to claim music came directly “outta” various shit holes.

5. Summery: If music appeared to be inspired by excessive yet fun amounts of Prozac, we cast it into the seasonal category. “Autumnly” was not as popular.

6. Psychedelic: Fond of extended guitar solos and synthesizers? We assumed you took drugs in the forest.

7. Radio-friendly: Always used as a slag. Although radio hasn’t been cutting-edge since the 1970s, music journalists felt it necessary to remind disc jockeys of that fact for another 30-plus years.

8. Radiohead-esque: In the mid-2000s, this meant “your music is possibly the result of mental trauma suffered in art school. Is it weird if we pray to you?”

9. Jangly: Used to describe peppy guitar pop. Made it sound like a bunch of people standing in front of a vending machine.

10. An [INSERT WORD] revival: Look. It’s rock ’n’ roll. At this point, unless you’ve managed to turn a Dyson vacuum cleaner into an instrument that plays alien rhythms at an undiscovered speed interval, audible only to people with a certain recessive chromosome, every bit of music put to tape is a revival.




 
 
 
 
 
 
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